Explaining Southern California's economy

It's the end of the euro as we know it

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Frank Rumpenhorst/AFP/Getty Images

The European currency Euro logo stands in front of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt/M., western Germany on August 4, 2011.

Greek gets a new government. Italy will soon get a government. And still the markets aren't calmed. The Dow flirted with a 400-point drop all day before closing at minus-389. Meanwhile, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy have finally just come out and said it: There should be two Europes — one run by...Germany and France, with the Euro as its currency; the other limping along with whatever's left in the Franco-German wake.

For critics of the Euro — and there have been plenty since the single currency was introduced in the 1990s — this is an "it's about time" moment. But even relative supporters are yelling surrender. At the Financial Times, Martin Wolf throws up his hands:

Will the eurozone survive? The leaders of France and Germany have now raised this question... If policymakers had understood two decades ago what they know now, they would never have launched the single currency. Only fear of the consequences of a break-up is now keeping it together. The question is whether that will be enough. I suspect the answer is, no.

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Eurozone crisis: Italy's 7 percent disaster

It's looking more and more like the Euro is toast. It's game over for Greece, and now Italy's bond yields have moved above 7 percent. Why is that such a big deal? Allow CNN to explain:

The 7% level is significant because that was the mark Ireland and Portugal crossed shortly before receiving bailouts from the European Union and International Monetary Fund. Ireland's actually rose above 8%, while Portugal's breached 9%. And yields for Greek bonds touched the 10% mark.

Italy's overall financial picture isn't especially terrible — people there have not borrowed themselves into a personal hole. It's just that the country's public finances are in tatters. And the third largest economy in Europe can't be in tatters. My Twitter feed isn't optimistic, as the Storify grab below demonstrates.

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What the MF Global bankruptcy means to you

MF Global Holdings Ltd Files For Bankruptcy

Mario Tama/Getty Images

MF Global: Lehman all over again? First victim of the European debt crisis? Or something even worse?

You may have heard by now that MF Global, a somewhat obscure Wall Street investment firm run by former Goldman Sacher and former New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine, imploded on Monday, declaring bankruptcy after failing to find someone to buy it. MF Global might also have illegally diverted money from client accounts to its own trading operations.

The firm is now being looked at as either (1) a sort of junior Lehman Brothers — which makes sense, as Corzine was trying to move MF Global into a spot in the much-reduced-by-the-financial-crisis firmament of investment banks — or (2) the first victim of the European debt crisis. 

At MarketWatch, Brett Arends goes a bit farther, pointing out that MF Global's abrupt meltdown will directly affect average investors, because those investors' mutual funds and pension funds were mixed up with Corzine's wannbe Goldman and its risky bet on European sovereign debt. 

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The Housing Crisis: Can prices fall even farther?

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A foreclosure sign sits in front of a home for sale.

Another month, another Case-Shiller index on housing prices — and more bad news for the housing economy. This is from the Wall Street Journal:

The Case-Shiller data come on the heels of the White House's revamp of a mortgage-refinance program for "underwater" borrowers—those who owe more than their homes are worth. But economists say there are few quick fixes for the housing crisis, and easier refinancing rules will do little to address weak demand for homes.

"It was a very bad spring-to-summer-market season," said Nancy Wallace, a finance professor at the University of California at Berkeley. She said a turnaround in the housing market remains largely dependent on loosening credit and a surge in hiring. "People are almost afraid to apply for mortgages and lots of people have little scratches and dents on their credit right now."

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