Explaining Southern California's economy

Why LA should be glad Steven Cohen didn't buy the Dodgers

Hedge Fund Manager Charged In Major Insider Trading Case Appears In Court

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Former hedge fund portfolio manager Mathew Martoma exits a New York federal court after being charged in one of the biggest insider trading cases in history. He worked for CR Intrinsic Investors LLC, a firm that was associated with Steven Cohen's SAC Capital Advisors.

Speculation about the size of a potential deal for AEG — estimates range from $8-$10 billion — has quickly made Angelenos forget about the $2-billion-plus price that Guggenheim Baseball Management and Magic Johnson paid for the L.A. Dodgers earlier this year. Angelenos may have forgotten something else: Until Guggenheim Partners swept in from Chicago to add another half billion to the deal, the price for team was hovering around $1.6 billion and the leading bidder was Steven Cohen.

As I explained at the time, Cohen — one of Forbes' wealthiest Americans, with a net worth north of $8 billion — was one of the few bidders for the Dodgers who could basically write a check for the team. In fact, that seemed the likely outcome, until Mark Walter and Guggenheim emerged from the background. Cohen had even paired up with local L.A. billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong, the richest guy in town. It wasn't enough in the end to trump Guggenheim's bid.

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What Larry Ellison brings to the AEG sale — $41 billion

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison demonstrates Or

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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison. The third-richest man in the U.S. might be a buyer for AEG.

It looks like Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle and number three on the latest Fortune 400 list of the richest Americans, may join the bidding for AEG, the entertainment and sports conglomerate that was recently put up for sale by multibillionaire owner Phil Anschutz.

Ellison's arrival on the bidding scene, when is being managed by the investment bank Blackstone, isn't exactly a surprise. He has shown and interest in sports teams in the past and has been involved with the America's Cup yacht race. In 2010, he bought a tennis professional tennis tournament held each year in Indian Wells.

If, as Reuters reports, his interest is legitimate, he joins a host of potential bidders, including Patrick Soon-Shiong, the richest man in Los Angeles, Guggenheim Partners (a subsidiary of which bought the Dodgers earlier this year for more than $2 billion), and private-equity firms, including Los Angeles' Colony Capital and Mitt Romney's old firm, Bain Capital.

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AEG sale: Guggenheim Partners and Soon-Shiong form bidding group

Government And Business Leaders Speak At Urban Economic Forum In Los Angeles

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Magic Johnson greets Patrick Soon-Shiong during a Urban Economic Forum co-hosted by White House Business Council and U.S. Small Business Administration. They could be partners (sort of) if Soon-Shiong and Guggenheim Partners buy AEG.

Patrick Soon-Shiong — the richest man in Los Angeles, minority owner of the Lakers, and recently thwarted suitor for the Dodgers — has reportedly hooked up with none other than the investors who did the thwarting on his billion-plus bid for the Boys in Blue: Guggenheim Partners.

Or at least the adventurous investing subset of Guggenheim — a relatively staid Chicago-based manager of insurance-fund investments and other assets totaling around $180 billion — made up of CEO Mark Walter and executive Tim Boehly. They formed Guggenheim Baseball Management with Magic Johnson as a front man to snatch the Dodgers away from Soon-Shiong and hedge-funder Steven Cohen at the eleventh hour, with a bid more than $500 million above what anyone had expected.

It was the biggest deal in U.S. sports up to that point. But if Soon-Shiong, Walter, Boehly and whoever else they yank onboard manages to buy all of AEG, the deal would blow the Dodgers' $2 billion away. It could go for anywhere from $4 billion to even as high as $7 or $8 billion.

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Los Angeles private-equity firm Colony Capital expected to bid for AEG

Colony-Capital

Colony Capital and its Chairman, Tom Barrack, are reportedly among the bidders for sports and entertainment giant AEG.

Anschutz Entertainment Group, lovingly referred by every sport and concert fan in the Southland as AEG, has put itself up for sale. This is potentially a true humdinger of a deal for Phil Anschutz, the reclusive Denver billionaire who started AEG a decade-and-a-half ago and has — with this considerable assistance of Tim Leiweke, who has run AEG day to day — build the enterprise up into a giant that could be worth anywhere from $4 to $8 billion, according to various reports, speculations, and back-of-the-envelope math on the privately held and somewhat secretive company.

The bidders are lining up, led by the richest man in L.A., Patrick Soon-Shiong, who took a shot at the Dodgers earlier this year and already owns a small stake in the Lakers (AEG owns a third of the team). His $7-billion-plus net worth wasn't enough to get to the finish line, however, even in partnership with $8-billion-plus-net-worth hedge funder Steve Cohen. 

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Follow the AEG money: Patrick Soon-Shiong, Blackstone, and Guggenheim Partners

Government And Business Leaders Speak At Urban Economic Forum In Los Angeles

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Magic Johnson greets Patrick Soon-Shiong during a Urban Economic Forum co-hosted by White House Business Council and U.S. Small Business Administration at Loyola Marymount University. Soon-Shiong has been named as an potential bidder for AEG, the sports and entertainment giant.

Patrick Soon-Shiong — the richest man in L.A., with a net worth north of $7 billion — has been named as a bidder for AEG, the L.A.-based sports/entertainment giant that owns the Lakers, the Staples Center, and L.A. Live, among many other assets and properties worldwide.

AEG would be a pretty big bite — L.A. Live and Staples could fetch $1 billion apiece, and stakes in the sports franchises could add up to half a billion — so Soon-Shiong is reportedly not going it alone. He's joined with Guggenheim Partners' executives Mark Walter and Todd Boehly, who formed Guggenheim Baseball Management earlier this year to buy the Dodgers for more than $2 billion.

AEG has hired the Blackstone Group to manage its sale. Blackstone also handled the sale of the Dodgers, conducting the final auction at which Guggenheim swept in at the end with a winning bid that was half a billion more than the next closest buyer, hedge fund guy Steven Cohen, whose $1.6-billion offer had looked indomitable up to that point. Ironically, Soon-Shiong joined with Cohen late in the game, only to lose out.

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