Explaining Southern California's economy

Remember Lehman Brothers? It's coming out of bankruptcy

Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission Holds Hearing In Washington

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

WASHINGTON - SEPTEMBER 01: Lehman Brothers former Chairman and CEO Richard Fuld is sworn in before testifying to the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission about the roots and causes of the 2008 financial and banking meltdown in U.S. and worldwide markets on Capitol Hill September 1, 2010 in Washington, DC. The commission begins two days of questioning about how two specific financial companies, Wacovia and Lehman Brothers, failed and why some institutions were considered "too big to fail" while others were allowed to fail. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Not that that means anything. All that's left of the once-proud Wall Street investment bank, whose bankruptcy precipitated the financial crisis, is $65 billion. And every single penny of that is spoken for.

This is from Reuters, via the LA Times:

Unsecured creditors will receive about 21 cents to 28 cents on the dollar, depending on the type of security they held. Shareholders, whose stock in the company hit a high of $86.18 in February 2007, according to Reuters Data, will receive nothing.

The company had $639 billion in assets when it went bankrupt. Some of that money was returned to brokerage customers in a separate proceeding. There remains $65 billion to be returned to creditors who have $450 billion in claims, a group that includes debt investors and trading partners from before the bankruptcy, such asĀ Goldman Sachs.

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