Explaining Southern California's economy

Making too much money is the least of UC Davis head's problems

Occupy UC Davis Protests Police Pepper Spray Incident

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi (C) wipes her eye as she is escorted to a car after speaking to Occupy protestors during a demonstration at the UC Davis campus on November 21, 2011 in Davis, California.

At Slate's Moneybox, Paul Collins does a deep dive into the compensation history of the chancellor at the University of California-Davis. He was evidently prompted by the controversy surrounding current chancellor Linda Katehi and her role in the pepper spray incident that occurred last year, when students were engaged in an Occupy protest.

Katehi makes $400,000, a figure that critics think might be too high for a university president. Collins calls her a "bona fide 1-percenter" and points out that UC Davis chancellor pay has "rocketed upwards in the last two decades" (he has the data to prove it).

All true, but these are the least of Katehi's worries — if she's worried about them at all. And anyone who thinks she's paid to much and that overcompensation should be held against her, especially given the pepper-spray incident...well, those folks need to dig a bit deeper into Katehi's background. They should ask if she should be getting $400,000 to run an institution that's ever likely to experience student protests or have to make quick decisions about the enforcement of order on campus. 

Read More...

Is Linda Katehi the right person to be running UC Davis?

Occupy UC Davis Protests Police Pepper Spray Incident

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

DAVIS, CA - NOVEMBER 21: UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi (C) wipes her eye as she is escorted to a car after speaking to Occupy protestors during a demonstration at the UC Davis campus on November 21, 2011 in Davis, California. Thousands of Occupy protestors staged a demonstration on the UC Davis campus to protest the UC Davis police who pepper sprayed students who sat passively with their arms locked during an Occupy Wall Street demonstration on November 18. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

In the aftermath of the UC Davis pepper spray incident, when campus cop Lt. John Pike unleashed the nasty dispersing agent on a group of Occupy protesters who had refused to leave the university's quad, Chancellor Linda Katehi has been standing her ground, cooperating with an investigation rather than resigning.

This sounds like a prudent course of action and has attained some credibility, especially now that former LA Police Chief and New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton — not a man to be trifled with — has been appointed by UC to lead to lead the inquiry.

But of course, the outcome is already baked in the cake. Chancellor Katehi, who reportedly ordered the campus cops to remove the protesters and their tents from the quad, is now fighting for her career. She's just thrown the offending officers under the bus, declaring that they defied her order to avoid a repeat of an earlier action against Occupy at UC Berkeley, which turned ugly.

Read More...