Explaining Southern California's economy

San Bernardino's finances were already dire in 2010

Researchers Predict Major Earthquake To Hit California In Next 30 Year

David McNew/Getty Images

San Bernardino City Hall. In 2010, the City Council was warned that bankruptcy was on the horizon.

A former San Bernardino City Council member, Tobin Brinker, commented on my post from yesterday about the bond markets being taken by surprise by the Inland Empire municipality's vote this week to become the third California city to declare bankruptcy. The one-time representative of the city's third ward wrote about a council meeting that took place in 2010: 

[C]ity Treasurer David Kennedy spoke and explained the city had lost $40 million dollars in its investment pool in the previous three years. If major changes aren't made he will not be able to certify that the city can meet its payroll for the next six months. He was the first person to mention BANKRUPTCY. The City Finance Director Barbara Pachon spoke and shared a slide titled "Symptoms of Bankruptcy." She informed council members that we unfortunately meet all of the symptoms....

Read More...

San Bernardino bankruptcy caught the bond market by surprise

Berdoo Bankrupt

Steven Cuevas / KPCC

San Bernardino city council voted to prepare a bankruptcy late Tuesday. The bind market was completely shocked.

You'd think a $3.7-trillion municipal bond market would watch over the cities that issue debt like a hawk. But of course, that can be tough when you're talking about something that big. And although ratings agencies like Moody's and S&P monitor the finances and prospects of default for thousands of cities, they don't always have a clue what's going on inside city hall.

Shocking as it may sound, right up until it voted to move toward a Chapter 9 declaration earlier this week, San Bernardino's bonds were rated "investment grade" — meaning that institutional investors and big mutual funds could buy them. Some of the city's bonds have been downgraded to "junk" status now, reports Reuters. But from the perspective of the bond market, San Bernardino didn't look like a city facing a fiscal crisis with effectively no money in the bank, the inability to meet its payroll, and a possible scandal brewing over whether the city has accurately represented its finances to the outside world.

Read More...

San Bernardino bankruptcy: Much worse than Stockton

Researchers Predict Major Earthquake To Hit California In Next 30 Year

David McNew/Getty Images

San Bernardino City Hall. The city's fiscal crisis could make its possible bankruptcy far worse than Stockton's.

The San Bernardino City Council voted last night to prepare to file bankruptcy. If the Inland Empire city does enter Chapter 9, it would be the third California municipality to do so this year, following Stockton and Mammoth Lakes.

But according to the bankruptcy lawyer who helped draft AB 506, the new California law that compels cities considering bankruptcy to first submit to a "neutral evaluation" process, and an economist who studies the Inland Empire, San Bernardino could look a lot worse than either of the cities that have already filed for Chapter 9.

"The San Bernardino situation is extremely challenging," said Karol Denniston of Schiff Hardin in San Francisco. "They don't seem to have considered the 506 process." 

A call to an aide to Mayor Patrick Morris to determine whether San Bernardino had considered going through mediation was not returned. [UPDATE: The mayor's Chief of Staff, Jim Morris, got back to me late Wednesday to explain that the city had considered the mediation requirement and is working with bankruptcy attorneys to ensure that the city is complying with state law. He also said that a fiscal emergency hasn't yet been declared but that it could soon be, in reponse to what he described as San Bernardino's cashflow crisis.]

Read More...

A Q&A on the San Bernardino bankruptcy

berdoo bankrupt

Steven Cuevas / KPCC

San Bernardino city council caps a 3-hour budget hearing by grimly approving authorization for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection. What would bankruptcy mean for the city of more than 200,000?

Last night, the San Bernardino City Council voted to prepare for a bankruptcy filing. If the city of 211,000 does enter Chapter 9, it would follow Stockton and Mammoth Lakes, both of which have turned over their finances to the courts in recent weeks after a new state-mandated mediation process failed to resolve heavy debt burdens and, in Mammoth Lakes' case, a legal judgment that was more than double the city's budget. San Bernardino would also be the second U.S. city of more than 200,000 to enter bankruptcy.

So what would bankruptcy mean for San Bernardino? I've created a Q&A that I'll follow up with some more in-depth reporting on San Bernardino's specific problems.

Q: Can San Bernardino declare bankruptcy right away?

A: It's unclear. A new California law requires municipalities to declare a fiscal emergency — San Bernardino says that it can't make its city payroll, which definitely qualifies — and enter a mediation period before officially filing for Chapter 9. In Stockton's case, this consumed about 90 days but was ultimately unsuccessful. In a July 26 analysis of the city's dire finances, the mediation process was referenced.

Read More...

Mammoth Lakes bankruptcy: Another debt-mediation failure

Mammoth Lakes

BasicGov/Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Mammoth Lakes. The ski town will declare bankruptcy after efforts to negotiate payment terms for a $43-million legal judgment broke down.

Hot on the heels of Stockton, Calif. becoming the largest U.S. city to declare bankruptcy, the far smaller hamlet of Mammoth Lakes has headed for Chapter 9, the municipal equivalent of Chapter 11. Mammoth Lakes is much smaller than Stockton — just south of 8,000 residents, versus 300,000 — but it used the same state-mandated mediation process to work things out with its creditors prior to declaring bankruptcy.

Mammoth Lakes was dealing with $2.8-million budget deficit, also much smaller than Stockton's $26-million gap, but still a gap. However, the real problem for Mammoth Lakes was a $43-million court settlement on a breach-of-contract with a developer, on a deal that dated to 1997. True, Mammoth Lakes was hit by the same housing downturn that crushed Stockton's finances, with the main difference being that Mammoth Lakes is a ski destination where second homes and condos can be appealing, while Stockton was trying to become a bedroom community for the San Francisco Bay area — a primary-home market.

Read More...