Explaining Southern California's economy

New CEO Marissa Mayer is a huge hire for Yahoo

FORTUNE Most Powerful Women Dinner New York City

Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Time Inc.

Marissa Mayer speaks onstage at the FORTUNE Most Powerful Women Dinner New York City. The 37-year-old was named CEO of Yahoo today.

One thing's for sure about newly named Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer: no one will question the Stanford computer science grad's credentials, as they ultimately did those of Mayer's predecessor, Scott Thompson, who had exaggerations in his resume that were revealed by activist Yahoo shareholder Dan Loeb earlier this year.

Mayer actually ups the ante on engineering cred: the 37-year-old was Google's first female engineer, as well as one of the first 20 employees hired (she was in fact number 20). She can't, however, repeat that achievement in the Yahoo C-suite: she follows Carol Bartz (ousted last September) as the second woman to hold the top job.

This move has taken the tech world by surprise ("shock" might be a better word). It was widely expected interim CEO Ross Levinsohn would get the nod, given that he seemed to have Loeb's support. In this respect, the naming of Mayer is earth-shattering, and it comes on the heels of rumors that she had been passed over for advancement at Google, even though she had been standing in for co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin at public events and in the media. Mayer ranks right alongside Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg as powerful women in Silicon Valley go.

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DeBord Report on 'America Now with Andy Dean,' May 25 edition

Andy Dean Banner

It's the Tuesday after a holiday Monday, so it must be time for me to post my weekly business and economy segment from "America Now with Andy Dean." A day later than usual. We will be back on the non-holiday schedule next week!

Andy and I covered the complete disaster that the Facebook IPO has become, especially the potential trouble CFO David Ebersman may face.

But we also discussed the bloodletting at HP under new CEO Meg Whitman, as well as just replacing the entire IPO process with massive Japanese all-girl bands and — this is a very good one — Barry Diller's kindasorta completely aggressive attempt to resell the broadcast T.V. signal to digital users by, get this, renting special antennas! That last one is fascinating.

As usual, Andy and I have a pretty good time running down the week's big news in business. Check us out live this Friday at 4 p.m. Pacific Time!

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The DeBord Report on 'America Now with Andy Dean'

Listen in to my weekly Economics Report segment on "America Now with Andy Dean." I've been doing this for a few weeks now, and have appeared in the broadcast a number times before that, and although Andy gives me plenty of grief for my "liberal" positions, I have to hand it to him: He does a three-hour radio show every day and really has his preparation down. Whenever we talk, he knows his numbers — cold. Good examples from Last Friday's show include our discussion of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's investigation of bank overdraft fees and of the Obama/Romney plans to reduces corporate taxes. We also have a little fun an the expense of Meg Whitman and HP's consternating plan to introduce a Windows-Intel tablet.

It's always great to talk to somebody who has a good grasp of data. My colleagues at KPCC always strike me as being great at this, as does Mr. Dean.

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Hewlett-Packard tablet reload still won't move the needle

Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Former California gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman was chosen to take over at Hewlett-Packard.

As you may recall, Hewlett-Packard distinguished itself in the tablet market by bringing out the TouchPad at $500 and then having to slash the price to $99 (well, BestBuy slashed the price) a little over the month later. Debacle! And this was with a reasonably nice device that ran WebOS, the superb operating system that HP picked up when it took over Palm.

Now Meg Whitman — she of the ill-fated bid for governor of California, now HP's CEO — has said that HP will introduce another tablet "before the end of this year" (Bloomberg) and that it will run Microsoft's Windows 8 OS...eventually.

Oh, also, there will be Intel chips.

It will be an HP Wintel tablet.

Hooray! What a wonderful plan! But... 

As I've written before, there is no tablet market — there's an iPad market. And the only company that's been able to take a bite out of Apple's dominance is Amazon, which with its Kindle Fire isn't selling a tablet but a tricked-out Kindle (a Kindroid) to use as leverage to get more people to purchase Amazon content.

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The Facebook Effect and the problem of California's budget

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Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a news conference at Facebook headquarters on October 6, 2010 in Palo Alto, California.

What exactly is the "Facebook Effect" and why could be both a boon and bane for California's budget crisis? According to the Legislative Analyst's Office, it's the massive amount of money that will be infused into California's sagging revenues when Facebook launches its anticipated IPO later this year.

Facebook isn't even going to sell that many shares to the public — it will probably continue a trend of "low float" IPOs in tech offerings, designed to elevate valuations (fewer shares equals higher demands equals higher prices). But it's still expected to raise $10 billion and achieve, overnight, a market valuation of $100 billion.

The capital gains from the creation of all those new Facebook millionaires will bring...well, billions to the state's coffers. As Bloomberg (via the San Francisco Chronicle) reports, Gov. Jerry Brown is estimating that 2012 will see $96 billion in total capital gains earned as income. The LAO figures rather less: $64 billion. 

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