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How can you profit from Apple's decline? Listen to Jeff Gundlach

Asia Reacts to the Death of Steve Jobs

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Dark days have arrived for Apple, as its stock prices falls from 2012 highs. One investor was bearish on the the stock when its was riding high, however: L.A.'s Jeff Gundlach.

Last year, Jeffrey Gundlach, the CEO of Los Angeles-based DoubleLine Capital, lay out what some called the most contrarian Apple trade imaginable. In spring of 2012, Apple was riding high, climbing to almost $640 per share in early April. It gave some of that back over the summer, but by September, it made all-time highs above $700 and Apple observers started seriously talking about it as the first $1,000 per share/$1 trillion company. 

Back in the spring, Gundlach predicted, in effect, that Apple's run was over. He put himself in the mind of a risk-craving hedge fund trader — his reputation is as a solid manager of bond investments, although his exit from his previous employer, TCW, was controversial — and recommended betting that Apple's share price would collapse. He paired that bet, his short position, with a call to go long on natural gas, so cheap at the time that it was practically free: around $2 per million BTUs. 

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