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The Tea Party is a political movement; Occupy is about protest

AP Photo/The Enterprise, Wayne Tilcock

In this Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, photo University of California, Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray to move Occupy UC Davis protesters while blocking their exit from the school's quad Friday in Davis, Calif. Two University of California, Davis police officers involved in pepper spraying seated protesters were placed on administrative leave Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011, as the chancellor of the school accelerates the investigation into the incident.

Just a quick comment on this segment from this morning's Airtalk broadcast. The issue is whether the Tea Party is getting media treatment equal to the Occupy Movement. 

I'd have to say probably not. But then again, this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison. The Tea Party is a political movement: it's an evolution of the Republican Party's libertarian element, which has been a factor, albeit a minor one, for decades. Occupy is a protest movement: it's not running anyone for office but rather complaining about the way the U.S. has allowed equality to stagnate under pressure from a global financial system run amok.

Both groups are angry about the current state of affairs. But their plans of action, strategies, and execution are different in trajectory. The Tea Party wanted to elect candidates and enter the mainstream political conversation. Occupy aimed to...take up space and provide a physical representation of what was really a fairly inchoate sense that something has gone horribly wrong with the nation. 

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