Explaining Southern California's economy

Case-Shiller: November Los Angeles home prices rise 7.7 percent for the year

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A for sale sign is seen in front of a home in Los Angeles. The Case-Shiller index of home prices for November reported that prices in L.A. rose by a decent margin in November.

Standard & Poor's Case-Shiller Home Price index for November released Tuesday and the news for Los Angeles is...about what it's been for the past year of reports from the closely monitored composites of housing prices in major U.S. metropolitan areas.

Los Angeles is included in both the 10- and 20-city Case-Shiller composites, which lag the market by two months and represent a three-month moving average of prices. That's why we're just getting November, even though it's now almost February.

L.A. home-price gains were modest from October to November – 0.4 percent, down slightly from the September-October gain of 0.6 percent. In terms of the overall index, however, Los Angeles beat the year-over-year average for November, with a 7.7 percent increase versus 5.5 percent for the full 20-city composite.

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Economist Richard Easterlin, defender of happiness — and possible Nobel Prize winner?

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Could an economist from the University of Southern California win the Nobel Prize in Economics? Not last year, but maybe this. Maybe.

The Nobel Prize in Economics will be announced on Monday. Some predictions can be found here — and they include Robert Shiller, who will be well known to readers of the DeBord report for developing, with fellow economist Karl Case, the Case-Shiller home price index, which comes out every month and tracks home prices in 20 U.S. cities. Shiller would be a commendable winner, but...

Last year, I posted on the lead-up to the Economics prize, suggesting that maybe, perhaps, a worthy winner would be Southern California's own Richard Easterlin. Easterlin has since cropped up several more times in this blog (he's always gracious with his time and generous with his insights), and it would be false of me to suggest that, in good hometown fashion, I'm not rooting for the father of happiness economics, still working away at USC, to nab some of that Swedish hardware.

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