Explaining Southern California's economy

All I want for Christmas is an Apple iPad...or maybe an iPad Mini...but a iPod or iPhone would be OK, too

A third or more of U.S. kids between 6 and 12 would very much like to have an Apple device this holiday season.

Former Internet analyst Mary Meeker has produced another of her "state of the Internet presentations," as venture capitalists (and avid blogger) Fred Wilson called it. Meeker is  a VC too now, at the blue-chip Silicon Valley firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Buyers. 

The presentation that Fred notes can be viewed on SlideShare and is 88 slides long. It covers a lot of ground. But the slide above is particularly interesting, heading into the the crunch period of the holiday shopping season. You know, the time of wish lists children write and, in some cases, mail to rotund, bearded figure of legend who lives in the northernmost reaches of the planet with a band of industrious elves and a group of reindeer capable of impressive aerial feats. 

Meeker notes that American kids between 6 and 12 want iPads and iPad Minis in impressive numbers. They want iPod Touches and iPhones in nearly equally impressive numbers. 

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Venture capital has shifted to funding business software

CFF VC Panel

Venture Capital in Southern California panel, moderated by the DeBord Report's Matt DeBord. These guys may be looking for different types of startups to invest in.

Fred Wilson, in typical clear and direct fashion, nails the shift as venture capitalists withhold additional rounds of funding from consumer-web companies and pivot toward the search for "enterprise" opportunities — ways to invest in software for businesses, not for the masses. Here's Fred:

[I]nvestors have moved from consumer to enterprise. there is a large pool of money in the venture capital asset class that is opportunistic, momentum driven, and thesis agnostic. this pool is driven largely by the public markets. this pool of capital was "all in" on consumer web/social web in the 2009-2011 time frame. it drove a lot of activity throughout the venture capital markets because each layer of the VC stack...needs to be aware of what the next layer up wants to fund. when the momentum/late stage wanted web/social, the layers below gave them web/social. Now that the momentum/late stage wants enterprise, we should expect the layers below to give them enterprise.

The combination of these three factors is making it harder for consumer internet companies (web and mobile) to get funding.

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Peter Chernin joins Twitter board: Will Hollywood and Silicon Valley finally get along?

Malaria No More International Honors Fifth Anniversary Benefit

Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Malaria No More

Peter Chernin speaks in New York City. The former News Corp. executive was just named to the Twitter board.

Twitter announced last week that Peter Chernin, a former News Corp. executive who has morphed into an entertainment investor, will join its board. Given that Twitter is perhaps better integrated than any other social network or microblogging site with the entertainment and news businesses, this is a pretty interesting development.

It also shows that Twitter could be getting serious about bolstering its financial credibility ahead of a possible IPO. This has long been discussed, but so far Twitter has lagged behind some of its peers, including Facebook and LinkedIn.

From the L.A. Times:

Chernin had been mentioned for months as a likely new Twitter director. He joins Chief Executive Dick Costolo, co-founder and former CEO Evan Williams, co-founder and Chairman Jack Dorsey, venture capitalists Fred Wilson of Union Square Ventures and Peter Fenton of Benchmark Capital, among others, on the board. He takes the place vacated by Flipboard CEO Mike McCue.

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Harvey Weinstein goes to London and praises Sarkozy, whales on Silicon Valley

Kris Connor/Getty Images for The Weinstein C

Harvey Weinstein has had just about enough of you Internet content pirates and proposes a draconian "French" solution.

If, in the aftermath of the Stop Online Piracy Act/Prevent IP Act (SOPA/PIPA) battle, you thought that only the most intense financiers of Silicon Valley continue to obsess over threats to the "open Internet, we give you...Harvey Weinstein! The Hollywood Reporter catches up with the outspoken producer in England, where he took the occasion of addressing the BFI London Film Festival to absolutely lay into Big Tech.

But first, he heaped praise on recently dethroned French President Nicholas Sarkozy (who awarded Weinstein the prestigious Légion d'honneur prior to leaving office):

"Whether you like his politics or not, this law was good," Weinstein said, "because people are disincentified to steal."

He said the results also could be seen in a country where 260 French movies were made last year, and difficult funding propositions, like the €14 million ($18 million) black-and-white silent film The Artist, could find people to fund it.

"You get a robust local industry from it," he said.

Weinstein's speech was full of humor and barbed observations.

"I love it when these Internet dudes say to me, ‘Hey man, we just want to be 'content neutral,' " Weinstein noted. "Next time, I'll say, 'Sure, I'll get my tie-dye shirt and come and sit in your billion dollar mansion in San Francisco or Silicon Valley for a while, soak it up.'"

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Can we expect to see more of the Winklevoss twins in LA?

America's Tyler Winklevoss and Cameron W

AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Tyler Winklevoss and Cameron Winklevoss at the start of the men's pair final during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games in Beijing. The twins have started a venture capital fund and are looking to establish an office in L.A.

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss — the Harvard-grad Olympic-rowing twins who infamously jousted in court with Mark Zuckerberg over who really had the core idea for Facebook — have begun the post-Facebook lives. Sort of. Their post-Facebook lives are being funded by an estimated $65-million cash-and-stock settlement the received from suing Zuckerberg and Facebook. 

With that dough, they're started a venture-capital fund, Winklevoss Capital, and as the Wall Street Journal reports, joined forces with their old Harvard classmate Divya Narendra on an initial $1-million investment in an semi-exclusive stock research site called SumZero

But they might also be spending some time apart. The Winklevii just bought a house in Hollywood last month for $18 million, reported Canyon News:

Tyler Winklevoss will remain in the 8,000 square foot home as they launch the West Wing of their venture capital company.... Cameron will remain mainly in New York City, where they have signed a five-year lease for their company's office.  

The two-story modern home with a jetliner view of Los Angeles was recently constructed as the house that had been on the lot before was bulldozed and modified. It is reported that the Winklevoss twins are in Los Angeles because they believe it is currently a great place for techies instead of Silicon Valley, where many firms are located. 

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