Explaining Southern California's economy

Facebook's earnings call: The Storify treatment

Facebook Sets IPO Price At 38 Dollars A Share

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Facebook's first earnings report wasn't disappointing. But a big question about its mobile growth prospects is dogging the company.

Facebook reported earnings for the first time today as a public company and, as expected, it mostly met Wall Street's expectations, earning $0.12 per share. But that didn't matter much, as the stock still got crushed in after-hours trading, diving well below its $38/share IPO offering price. How could this be, on a day when the markets rallied on news that the European Central Bank will — wink, wink — not allow the euro to fail, according ECB President Mario Draghi?

I listened to Facebook's earnings call, which feature CEO mark Zuckerberg in additional to COO Sheryl Sandberg and CFO David Ebersman — he of the botched IPO — in speaking roles. The focus of the call was mobile, mobile, mobile. Facebook has almost a billion PC users and half a billion mobile users. And it's to this latter group that Wall Street is now looking for growth. Unfortunately, Facebook just isn't there yet on developing an ad platform for the mobile environment. And it may not get there for a while. 

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Storify: The Brown tax proposal — and the reaction!

I've been Storifying the euro crisis, so I thought I'd use the tool to capture some Twitter commentary in reaction to California Gov. Jerry Brown's new tax proposal. Were people surprised that Brown wants to dodge the Legislature, raise taxes, and go straight to voters via the ballot initiative process. They were not. The Twitterverse had additional insight, as well.

Follow Matthew DeBord and the DeBord Report on Twitter.

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Eurozone Crisis: Never miss a single day

Just because markets are up in the U.S., that doesn't mean Europe isn't still basically going to hell. The Eurozone hasn't been granted a reprieve simply because a few prime ministers have been sent packing. Greece still has massive debt. Italy still has massive debt. Spain still has massive debt. This may not end well. At least, it may not end with the euro surviving as a currency

Storify tells the tale:

Follow Matthew DeBord and the DeBord Report on Twitter.

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Storifying the Eurozone crisis

My colleague Tony Pierce, our new blog editor here at KPCC, has got me messing around with Storify, which he believes will lead us to a glorious future in social media and blogging. I have to say, I think I agree with him.

Anyway, the title (below) says it all, now that Italy looks like it might be the next victim of the euro's meltdown. What will save it? Silvio Berlusconi must step down, and a government of "technocrats" — sort of like management consultants, only they're with...the goverment — will fill the political void and fix Italy. Here's what a sampling of my @DeBordReport Twitter feed thinks.

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