Explaining Southern California's economy

Business Insider's BlackBerry-iPhone anxiety

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

A man checks his email on a Blackberry.

Attack the iPhone, get over 210,00 page views. That's what Business Insider's Matt Lynley has achieved with this post about why he likes the BlackBerry more than the iPhone

OK, it's a slide show. That's part one of what I should recognize by now as a classic bit of BI linkbaiting-and-switiching. It's also a bait-and-switch in that Lynley only seems to prefer the BlackBerry because he's bored with the iPhone, which he's been using for four years.

However, he makes a very salient point along the way. 

The BlackBerry still absolutely kills it with email. So it was in the beginning. And so it is still.

There's a whole grand saga playing itself out in the mediasphere these days, as business-minded BlackBerry users (read: productive types) grapple with the decline of BlackBerry's makers, Research in Motion, and adapt themselves to the giddy world of the iPhone, much of which seems designed for esthetes and teenagers (read: they like toys), but which is...getting better at the whole enterprise thing.

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Can Google Reader be saved?

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KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images

Google Plus challenging the social media dominance of Facebook and Twitter

Bloggers have traditionally been core users of Google Reader. We need the tool to keep track of the blogosphere and have a single interface through which all posts flow. However, outside the blogging world, Google Reader is being displaced by a deluge of social-media products, like Facebook, Twitter, and Google's own Google Plus.

Meanwhile, Google has been rolling out a comprehensive redesign of all its interfaces. Reader got sucked in, much to the displeasure of the blogging community. Nobody seems to like it, but then again, those nobodies are all old-fogey bloggers who ruled the realm in 2007 but are now ready to be put out to pasture. 

The biggest complaint is that all sharing is now being bent to the will of Google Plus. Gotta get those fossils out of the second George W. Bush administration!

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The state of venture capital and tech investment

TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2011 - Day 3

Araya Diaz/Getty Images for TechCrunch

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 14: (L-R) TechCrunch Founder and Co-Editor Michael Arrington,500 Startups Venture Capitalist & Founding General Partner David Mclure, Tasty Labs Co-Founder and CEO Aydin Senkut, Freestyle Capital Founding Partner Josh Felser, SoftTech VC Managing Partner Jeff Clavier, and SV Angel angel investor Ron Conway speak onstage at Day 3 of TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2011 held at the San Francisco Design Center Concourse on September 14, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Araya Diaz/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

If you aren't reading Fred Wilson, you should. He's a venture capitalist who runs Union Square Ventures in New York and regularly writes about being a VC at his aptly named blog, AVC. Many people who are pondering the woeful state of the U.S. economy are looking to tech as something that may lead us out of the woods. Problem is, tech costs money. And tech is extremely competitive. And there's been some discussion of late that VCs are having trouble raising money to fund new companies.

Wilson breaks it down. Here's what I think is his most interesting point:

5) The internet investing market is transitioning. Social was the driving force for the past three or four years. In the wake of Facebook and Twitter, how could it not be? Mobile has also been a hot theme. Both sectors have consolidated a few winners and a number of additional interesting emerging companies. But how many social platforms of scale will there be? Five, ten, twenty? And mobile is hard because distribution continues to be limited to the app store model where you get on the leaderboard and win or you don't and you don't. Investors are moving into new areas like cloud, peer to peer marketplaces, and trying to take what worked in consumer into the enterprise. There is no lack of interest in internet investing, but investors are having to learn new markets and new sectors. And that kind of transition takes the heat out of an overheated market.

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Tweet of the Day: BlackBerry meltdown

The mighty Arianna summarized what, a little closer to our neck of the woods, The Wrap packaged as "Hollywood Exhales: BlackBerry Service Is Back." What happened is that, after seeing its business start to slip through its fingers over the past year, BlackBerry maker Research In Motion encountered a nightmare scenario: its supposedly secure, supposedly bulletproof network has spent three days failing.

Globally.

It began in Europe and the Middle East but was looking like it wouldn't make it to U.S. or Canada. Today, however, we got hit on this side of the pond. The outage was brief, but the outrage was audible. For one thing, we learned that Arianna travels with three BlackBerrys. She didn't say which one she was tweeting from. Although for all we know, she could have a six iPhones and two iPads tucked in her Vuitton carryon. Maybe even a Vertu.

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Federal Reserve plans to monitor blogs and social media. But will it actually read them?

The times, they are a-changin' at the stodgy old Federal Reserve. We used to think of it a financial temple from which a priestly caste of economic policy makers would periodically emerge to make oracular pronouncements of the sort depicted in the video of Fed chairman Alan Greenspan bantering with Ron Paul. Now the Fed plans to keep track of social media and the blogosphere to better understand how it's perceived.

This is from a really great Neal Ungerleider story at Fast Company:

[T]he Fed is now evaluating bids for a social media analysis system that will mine data from Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, blogs, and web forums--beginning in December. In order to "handle crisis situations" and "track reach and spread of […] messages and press releases," the project will also identify a number of what they call "key bloggers and influencers" to target with their outreach, and presumably monitoring, efforts.

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