Explaining Southern California's economy

Microsoft won the AOL patent bidding and is now selling to...Facebook

CeBIT 2012 Technology Trade Fair

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Visitors watch a presentaiton of fetaures of the new Windows 8 operating system at the Microsoft stand on the first day of the CeBIT 2012 technology trade fair in Hanover, Germany. Microsoft announced that its selling $550-million worth of former AOL patents to Facebook.

Microsoft recently beat out Facebook for the right to purchase 925 patents and patent applications from AOL. The winning bid? $1.6 billion. But now Microsoft has turned around and essentially flipped a large portion of that patent portfolio, and the buyer is...Facebook!

In the context of a declining stock market and problems in Europe, Facebook — and more accurately, Facebook's investors — has to be getting worried about its upcoming IPO, which is supposed to be able to value the company at $100 billion. The Instagram purchase was stage one. Now comes this big patent buy, with Facebook paying for $550-million worth of patents that Microsoft evidently doesn't really need.

That said, you could argue — as CNET's Paul Sloan implies — that Microsoft was just doing Facebook a nice, big favor by leveraging its balance sheet to vacuum up the AOL patents, sparing Facebook the need to spend any of its own cash. Microsoft is nowhere in social media, so a "long-standing alliance" with Facebook makes sense, as both companies pitch in to weaken Google. 

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Can Hollywood win young men back from video gaming?

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Activision’s video game, "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2," shattered sales records and became the biggest release of any entertainment property ever in 2009, earning $310 million in 24 hours and solidifying video games as the entertainment medium of today.

At The Wrap, Sharon Waxman offers a list of remedies for what ails the movie business. One of them jumped out at me:

Find a way to connect the gaming obsession of what used to be the core moviegoing audiences – young males 13-24 – with the movie experience. Learn from that interactivity and use that to drive them to the multiplex. (This is a challenge for marketing geniuses. Hollywood has plenty of those.)

Sounds great, but this isn't a marketing problem — it's a medium problem. Apart from technical innovations in digital filmmaking, special effects, and 3-D, the movies are basically the same as they were 30, 40, 50 years ago. A bunch of people sit in a large darkened room and wait for huge moving image to be projected onto a screen. The seats are more comfortable and the sodas are vastly larger. But the medium is about as 20th century as could be. Mid-20th century.

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