Explaining Southern California's economy

Could a condom ballot measure drive the porn business into bankruptcy?

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

An empty condom package rests on a table during the shooting of a porn scene for the adult film production company Vivid, 18 May 2004, on the set in Canoga Park, California, about 40 miles west of Los Angeles.

UPDATE: Last year at Minyanville, Susannah Breslin explored allegations that the porn business, contrary to popular belief, is actually a terrible business that barely rises to the description.

Earlier today, my colleague Tony Pierce posted on the LA City Attorney office's lawsuit against a proposed ballot measure for June 2012 that would require all male porn actors on sets in Los Angeles to wear condoms in order for productions to be permitted. The measure is supported by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which has been advocating to take this issue to the voters for a while:

The foundation was only required to get 41,000 signatures to get the measure on the ballot. They gathered approximately 71,000. [AHF Executive Director] Michael Weinstein said they had no trouble getting enough people to sign the petition.

"It was not difficult at all," Weinstein said. "The overwhelming majority of people - liberal and conservative, of all ages and genders - understand this issue as an issue of fairness and worker protection."

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We're not ready for the end of email yet

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

A man checks his email on a Blackberry.

Thanks to Felix Salmon for pointing me to this Financial Times post by Maija Palmer about the end of email. Yes, that's right — it's yet another argument that email is outdated, badly designed, and the death of all things productive. Here's a taste:

The ability to track email is increasingly becoming a turn-off. Anecdotal evidence suggests that in an age of heightened regulation, bankers are eschewing email in favour of less traceable forms of communications, such as hand-written notes...

However, for many companies, it is simply that email is seen as inefficient. “We believe email is fundamentally unproductive, you need to sift through too many documents and things get lost,” says Leerom Segal, president and chief executive of Klick, a Canadian digital marketing company. “It has no prioritisation, no workflow, and assumes that the most important item is the one at the top. My business partner became so frustrated with how dumb email was, that 14 years ago he began to build better tools for us to manage workflow.”

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Should Occupy LA pay $400,000 to restore City Hall park?

Corey Moore/KPCC

Occupy LA encampment the morning after Mayor Villaraigosa's eviction order went into effect.

The bill is in for Occupy LA. This is from AP:

A preliminary report by the Los Angeles city administrative officer estimates the nearly two-month Occupy LA encampment at City Hall cost the city at least $2.3 million...

[...]

But the report notes that the estimate does not include the cost of restoring City Hall park. A rough early estimate of restoring the park to its original condition was $400,000.

That's some not-inconsiderable coin. And it does raise an important question: Should Occupy LA, in as much as it's able, defray some of the cost? After all, Occupy Wall Street could make a mess in Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan, but a few high-pressure hoses, some disinfectant, and a small fleet of dump trucks could clean it up (after the protesters had left, of course). 

Occupy LA, on the other hand, camped out for weeks on what had been green(ish) grass. Which is now neither green nor grass anymore. 

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Internet uproar forces GoDaddy flip-flop on SOPA support

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Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images

GoDaddy is no longer supporting SOPA. It's sticking with Danica Patrick, however. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

The Internet registrar GoDaddy was one of the big proponents of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) — opposed to the likes of Google, Facebook, Yahoo, and Twitter — but now it suddenly isn't. Why? Simple: GoDaddy's stance toward SOPA was seriously threatening its bottom line.

It was a victory for the anti-SOPA contingent. This is from VentureBeat:

As one of the largest domain registrars, Go Daddy’s support of SOPA was extremely alarming to many people and companies with a strong presence on the internet because it could make de-indexing domain names much easier.

Talk of a Go Daddy boycott began yesterday on community link sharing site Reddit, and quickly grew to include several influential business leaders and media personalities. Among them were Y Combinator founder Paul Graham, Cheezburger CEO Ben Huh and celebrity/investor Ashton Kutcher.

The company initially shrugged off the protests, issuing a nonchalant response to let people know it hasn’t negatively impacted its business — which was the equivalent of shaking the hell out of a giant beehive and not expecting to get stung. Boycott participators responded by publishing step-by-step tutorials for transferring a bulk of domains to a new registrar, complete with recommendations to competitors.

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Good rich people v. bad rich people: Whom to hate

Dow Jones Industrial Average Closes Slightly Down

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

At the Nation, Jamelle Bouie pretty well summarizes not just what the Occupy Movement stands for, but what lots of everyday Americans are feeling:

It’s hard to look at the wealth worshiping of American culture and conclude that Americans hate the rich. Rather, Americans hate people who become rich through rent-seeking, and then use their power and influence to pull up the ladder for everyone else. Financial elites crashed the economy, but rather than suffer any adverse consequences for their reckless behavior, they’ve prospered. Worse, they’ve yet to show any contrition for their actions, even as millions of Americans—who had no part in the sideshow—languish in a wounded economy.

This is the end result of what some have called the "financialization" of the U.S. economy, with the financial-services sector accounting for a historically disproportionate share of GDP. 

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