So Cal education, LAUSD, the Cal States and the UCs

Deasy to propose tougher LA Unified credit requirements

Krista Kennell/AFP/Getty Images

Los Angeles schools Supt. John Deasy speaks during a press conference at South Region High School #2 in Los Angeles, California February 6, 2012.

An “educational equity” policy the LAUSD school board passed seven years ago may take effect this fall. Critics say the new plan, intended to level the playing field for Latino and Black students, could actually increase their dropout rate. 

LAUSD Superintendent John Deasy acknowledges that the University of California won’t accept every graduate from his district, but he wants all of them to qualify for admission. 

That’s why at the next board meeting he’ll propose revised graduation requirements for all students starting with the Class of 2016. 

Under the new plan, every student must pass a series of courses (the A through G curriculum) required for admission to the Cal State or UC systems. The number of required credits for graduation would drop from 230 units to 180, because LAUSD would eliminate requirements for non-academic classes. 

The superintendent says this would give students greater opportunity to pass classes with at least a C (the new threshold for class credit). 

Several school board members strongly oppose Deasy’s new plan, saying it sets too high a bar for most students in the district. Only 15 percent of last year’s graduating class passed the A-G core with a C average or better. 

But the superintendent maintains that it’s the school system’s duty to deliver college-ready and career-ready adults.

The school board meets on Tuesday.

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