So Cal education, LAUSD, the Cal States and the UCs

Prop. 30 fact check: Will higher taxes push businesses to leave California?

Consumer Confidence Index Hits Lowest Level Since Record Began In 1967

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A parking lot is seen empty at an out-of-business store January 27, 2009 in Vallejo, California. Fact check No. 1: Higher taxes aren't necessarily a business killer -- divorce may be a bigger factor.

With less than a week to the Nov. 6 election, there's a lot of information - and misinformation - out there about Prop. 30. The measure, supported by Gov. Jerry Brown, would raise sales and income taxes in order to avert $6 billion in primarily education cuts.

Prop. 30 is written into the enacted 2012-13 California budget, which presumes that the measure will be approved by a majority of voters Tuesday. Over the next several posts, we'll try to break down the proposition and examine the big questions that have been raised in political ads over the last weeks.

What Prop. 30 does: Increases personal income tax for seven years on people making more than $250,000. It would be implemented retroactively, starting Jan. 1, 2012. People making between $250,000 and $300,000 would pay 1% more (up to $3,000). People making between $300,000 and $500,000 would pay 2% more and people making more than $500,000 would pay 3% more in taxes.

Read More...

LAUSD urges students, community members to vote

Presidential Primary Election

Grant Slater/KPCC

LAUSD officials are urging students, parents and community members to vote in next month's election. The district has nearly 11,000 students who are 18 years old.

Like public school educators throughout the state, L.A. Unified officials and board members are urging students, parents and concerned adults to vote in next month's election and are working to inform them about Propositions 30 and 38.

Both measures aim to generate money through tax increases to avert about $6 billion in cuts to education. (For more on those measures visit KPCC's political blog Represent.)

School board member Tamar Galatzan will hold a town hall Tuesday night in the west San Fernando Valley. Representatives from the Prop. 30 and 38 campaigns will be present. So will Superintendent John Deasy and other L.A. Unified officials who can help answer specific questions.

The meeting will be at Cleveland High School, which is located at 8140 Vanalden Avenue, Reseda, CA 91335 in the Multi-Purpose Room. There will be on-site parking and Spanish translation.

Read More...

Education and the 2012 election: A strategist's analysis

Julie Small/KPCC

"The governor [has] got to get out there and say 'Look, this is the California that I envisioned, and in that California, schools play a critical role. It's about the future of our kids. It's about the future of the state and the country. And this is how [Prop.] 30 fits into that," said Darry Sragow, a longtime political strategist.

Over the weekend, I spoke with Darry Sragow, an attorney and longtime Democratic strategist, about education's role in the 2012 election. Sragow has worked on several school bond campaigns at L.A. Unified and the Los Angeles Community College District. I picked his brain on the role of education in the national debate this election season. I also got some of his thoughts on the campaigns for Prop. 30 and Prop. 38. Educators throughout the state support the two initiatives to raise taxes in the hope that voters will approve them next month and school budgets will be saved.

Q: Why is education not really figuring into the national debate during this election season?

A: Education is usually in California the No. 1 issue. If it's not education, it's the economy, and at the moment, it's the economy. Education is not an issue most voters think can be inherently dealt with at a national level. Schools are local and so voters inherently expect to have a dialogue about education in local races and maybe in state races in their state, but it's really a national issue only in a very broad policy sense. That's not insignificant, because at a national level you can set standards, "No Child Left Behind," things like that. But it's tough to address it concretely in the national race. Plus, of course, the big national issue is jobs.

Read More...