So Cal education, LAUSD, the Cal States and the UCs

Prop. 30 fact check: Schools are a mess, so why should we pay more?

scantron standardized test

timlewisnm/Flickr Creative Commons

Fact check No. 4: Schools are a mess because of $20 billion in cuts to education funding over the past four years. But test scores are rising despite that.

Next up: We examine the claim --  Schools are a mess, so why should we pay more?

Background: With less than a week to the Nov. 6 election, there's a lot of information - and misinformation - out there about Prop. 30. The measure, supported by Gov. Jerry Brown, would raise sales and income taxes in order to avert $6 billion in primarily education cuts.

Prop. 30 is written into the enacted 2012-13 California budget, which presumes that the measure will be approved by a majority of voters Tuesday. Over several posts, we try to break down the proposition and examine the big questions that have been raised in political ads these past few weeks.

Read the introductory post for details on what Prop. 30 does and what happens if it fails. 

Arguments against Prop. 30: The arguments fall under four main categories: no new taxes, the measure is flawed, the money would be wasted, and schools are a mess. These positions are primarily supported by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., the National Federation of Independent Business California and Small Business Action Committee.

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Prop. 30 fact check: California's budget has grown, so how are we broke?

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Fact check No. 3: State spending as a share of California's economy has dropped and is now down to its lowest levels since 1972-3. Though lottery money does go to schools, it's a drop in a very large bucket, California finance officials say.

Next up: We examine the claim that Prop. 30 money would be wasted.

Background: With less than a week to the Nov. 6 election, there's a lot of information - and misinformation - out there about Prop. 30. The measure, supported by Gov. Jerry Brown, would raise sales and income taxes in order to avert $6 billion in primarily education cuts.

Prop. 30 is written into the enacted 2012-13 California budget, which presumes that the measure will be approved by a majority of voters Tuesday. Over several posts, we try to break down the proposition and examine the big questions that have been raised in political ads these past few weeks.

Read the introductory post for details on what Prop. 30 does and what happens if it fails. 

Arguments against Prop. 30: The arguments fall under four main categories: no new taxes, the measure is flawed, the money would be wasted, and schools are a mess. These positions are primarily supported by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., the National Federation of Independent Business California and Small Business Action Committee.

Read More...

Prop. 30 fact check: We'll never know where the money actually goes

Gov. Jerry Brown

Sharon McNary/KPCC

California Gov. Jerry Brown speaks in support of Prop. 30 at a rally of UCLA students on campus, Oct. 16, 2012. Fact check No. 2: The $8.5 billion brought in by Prop. 30 will go to a "lockbox" called the Education Protection Account and can't be spent on anything else.

Next up: We examine the claim that Propostion 30 is a flawed measure.

Background: With less than a week to the Nov. 6 election, there's a lot of information - and misinformation - out there about Prop. 30. The measure, supported by Gov. Jerry Brown, would raise sales and income taxes in order to avert $6 billion in primarily education cuts.

Prop. 30 is written into the enacted 2012-13 California budget, which presumes that the measure will be approved by a majority of voters Tuesday. Over several posts, we try to break down the proposition and examine the big questions that have been raised in political ads these past few weeks.

Read the introductory post for details on what Prop. 30 does and what happens if it fails. 

Arguments against Prop. 30: The arguments fall under four main categories: no new taxes, the measure is flawed, the money would be wasted, and schools are a mess. These positions are primarily supported by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., the National Federation of Independent Business California and Small Business Action Committee.

Read More...

Prop. 30 fact check: Will higher taxes push businesses to leave California?

Consumer Confidence Index Hits Lowest Level Since Record Began In 1967

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A parking lot is seen empty at an out-of-business store January 27, 2009 in Vallejo, California. Fact check No. 1: Higher taxes aren't necessarily a business killer -- divorce may be a bigger factor.

With less than a week to the Nov. 6 election, there's a lot of information - and misinformation - out there about Prop. 30. The measure, supported by Gov. Jerry Brown, would raise sales and income taxes in order to avert $6 billion in primarily education cuts.

Prop. 30 is written into the enacted 2012-13 California budget, which presumes that the measure will be approved by a majority of voters Tuesday. Over the next several posts, we'll try to break down the proposition and examine the big questions that have been raised in political ads over the last weeks.

What Prop. 30 does: Increases personal income tax for seven years on people making more than $250,000. It would be implemented retroactively, starting Jan. 1, 2012. People making between $250,000 and $300,000 would pay 1% more (up to $3,000). People making between $300,000 and $500,000 would pay 2% more and people making more than $500,000 would pay 3% more in taxes.

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