So Cal education, LAUSD, the Cal States and the UCs

Following up: A look at the recommended map for new school board boundaries

Map

LAUSD

Detail of new LAUSD map

The LAUSD Redistricting Commission's staff sent out a new email at 1:30 p.m. with a corrected version of their recommended map of new boundaries for LAUSD school board districts.

Despite five hours of heated discussion, the commission overwhelmingly agreed on the map with a 14-1 vote last Thursday.

Check it out for yourself. KPCC has uploaded the PDF, since you still can't get it online.

Not that this maps makes thing more clear. Even the commissioners have had trouble figuring out where the lines are drawn. Can you find the boundaries of your school board's district in this map?

Tami Abdollah can be reached via email and on Twitter (@latams).

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Days after vote, recommended maps for LAUSD school board boundaries still not online

maps

Tami Abdollah / KPCC

Members of the public at a Redistricting Commission meeting Tuesday night at Hamilton High School looking at proposed maps.

A once-in-a-decade proposed map for new school board boundaries is still not on the city's official LAUSD Redistricting Commission website, days after the public was asked to weigh in on their proposals, and after a commission vote.

At noon today, the commission's staff sent out a public email with an attached recommended map and said it was was still working with the city to get the information on their site. A section for the maps were added to the site by 1 p.m. today, but no maps were there, only a blank page.

The 15 volunteer members of the LAUSD Redistricting Commission began meeting last October to prepare for the map-drawing process, create maps and provide their input into the technical process, which must take place every 10 years to account for population shifts. The numbers are drawn from the census.

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Redistricting commission votes on new LA Unified school board boundaries

LAUSD redistricting commission

Tami Abdollah / KPCC

The LAUSD Redistricting Commission met Feb. 23 to vote on a map to send on to the City Council for new school board district lines.

LAUSD redistricting commission

Tami Abdollah / KPCC

The LAUSD Redistricting Commission met Feb. 23, 2012 to vote on a map to send on to the City Council for new school board district lines. School board member Marguerite LaMotte can be seen wearing pink in the front row.


After five hours of heated discussion Thursday night that included accusations of political pandering, gerrymandering, and a lack of public outreach, the L.A. Unified Redistricting Commission overwhelmingly agreed on a map of new school board boundaries to send over to the City Council.

The map named "Cv1" (plus minor adjustments) was approved by a 14-1 commission vote. Commissioner Mark Lewis voted against the map because he said it would break up multiple communities within District 5.

Commissioners have spoken out against the redistricting process with several saying Thursday that it was rushed and did not do enough to involve and inform the public. In meetings held over the last weeks for public input, a total of about 1,000 people showed up, said the commission's executive director Doug Wance. LAUSD is the nation's second-largest district and serves nearly 700,000 students.

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'Who in the hell has drawn these maps?' asks school redistricting commissioner

maps

Tami Abdollah / KPCC

Members of the public at a Redistricting Commission meeting Tuesday night at Hamilton High School looking at proposed maps.

Tami Abdollah/KPCC

A member of the public expresses concern over redistricting maps.

Maps

Tami Abdollah / KPCC

Members of the public at a Redistricting Commissio meeting Tuesday night at Hamilton High School looking at proposed maps.


While Los Angeles has remained fixated by an onslaught of teacher scandals, a quieter process to redistrict the school board's boundaries has gone on with little media coverage and a relatively small amount of public input.

Tonight the city's Redistricting Commission will vote on a final map or maps to present to the L.A. City Council by March 1. Ostensibly these are maps the 15 commissioners have prepared after months of work and reflection including hosting multiple meetings with the public for their thoughts. 

But according to Dermot Givens, who was appointed by board member Margueritte LaMotte, that's not exactly what has happened.

As a quick bit of background, the L.A. City Council must redraw the lines for the LAUSD's seven Board of Education districts at least once every 10 years to account for population shifts. The Redistricting Commission advises the council on drawing the district lines, and the commissioners must take public input and adhere to certain policies in drawing lines, such as honoring communities with similar interests, neighborhoods, and even population distribution. Their redistricting proposal must be presented to the City Council by March 1. After that, the city has until July 1 to decide on a final map.

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