So Cal education, LAUSD, the Cal States and the UCs

UC Davis to release pepper-spray report, but will redact officers' names

Occupy Pepper Spray

Wayne Tilcock / AP

File: In this Nov. 18, 2011 file photo, University of California, Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray to move Occupy UC Davis protesters while blocking their exit from the school's quad in Davis, Calif.

When police at UC Davis pepper-sprayed a group of peaceful protestors, the outcry over the incident led to a formal investigation. The school is now set to release its report, but some elements — specifically the names of the police officers involved — will not be made public.

It was home video of an officer spraying a line of Occupy protestors as they knelt in a campus quad last November that led to public demand for an investigation. A task force led by a retired California Supreme Court Justice followed through, but the campus police union sued to stop the release of the report.

Attorneys for the union said officers’ names should be blacked out for their safety. The judge hearing the case noted that Lt. John Pike, identified as the one spraying protestors, said he received tens of thousands of threatening or derogatory text messages, emails and letters in the months after the incident. People also ordered magazines, products and food delivered to Lt. Pike’s home.  

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Task force plans to release findings on UC Davis pepper spray incident (again)

Occupy Pepper Spray

Wayne Tilcock / AP

File: In this Nov. 18, 2011 file photo, University of California, Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray to move Occupy UC Davis protesters while blocking their exit from the school's quad in Davis, Calif.

The task force investigating the pepper spraying of peaceful protesters at UC Davis in November has tentatively scheduled the public release of its report and recommendations for Wednesday.

The release of the report was delayed for weeks as attorneys for the UC and the police union wrangled over whether the release would constitute a disclosure of confidential information.

After an initial court hold was placed on the release, there were more hearings and Alameda County Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo ruled the report could be unveiled without the names of some campus police officers.

The two parties have agreed that only the names of UC Davis Police Lt. John Pike and Chief Annette Spicuzza will remain in the report, and all other names are to be redacted, said UC spokeswoman Dianne Klein.

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California ban on using race in UC admissions still OK, federal court says

ucla

Photo by Chris Radcliff via Flickr Creative Commons

California's voter-approved ban on using race, ethnicity and gender in public college and university admissions is not unconstitutional, a federal appeals court said today.

The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday that Proposition 209, which was passed by voters in 1996, does not violate students' constitutional rights, the AP reports.

Since the 1996 voter initiative passed, Proposition 209 has faced multiple legal challenges.

Proponents of affirmative action say campus diversity at the state's public schools has suffered since taking race out of admissions consideration.

Here's a very brief sampling of enrollment numbers from two well-known California public schools that are often criticized for lacking diversity as a result of Prop. 209.

At UC Berkeley enrollment data from Fall 2011 shows roughly 27 percent of the campus population classified itself as White; 21 percent as Chinese; 7 percent Mexican American/Chicano; 3 percent African American/Black.

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Court documents give some details on UC pepper spray investigation

Occupy UC Davis Protests Police Pepper Spray Incident

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

DAVIS, CA - NOVEMBER 21: UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi (C) is escorted to a car after she spoke to Occupy protestors during a demonstration at the UC Davis campus on November 21, 2011 in Davis, California. Thousands of Occupy protestors staged a demonstration on the UC Davis campus to protest the UC Davis police who pepper sprayed students who sat passively with their arms locked during an Occupy Wall Street demonstration on November 18. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Some more details on the University of California's task force investigation into the pepper spraying of peaceful protesters by UC Davis police are contained in the court documents filed Tuesday by the system.

Attorneys representing the UC system and the campus police union will be in an Oakland courtroom Friday for a hearing on whether a court hold on the public release of reports into the November incident will remain in place.

A task force report was ordered by UC President Mark Yudof at the request of UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi. An independent inquiry was also performed, and a report generated from that, by the consulting firm Kroll.

According to the university system's court filing, the task force was told to receive and review Kroll's report; then based on that review and other available information issue findings regarding "responsibility for the events"; and finally, provide recommendations on improvements to "police procedures, command protocols, and campus policies and oversight structures that will help ensure the rights and safety of non-violent protesters and the entire campus community are protected."

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UC attorneys to argue for release of task force report on pepper spraying incident

Occupy UC Davis Protests Police Pepper Spray Incident

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

DAVIS, CA - NOVEMBER 21: Occupy protestor hold signs during a demonstration at the UC Davis campus on November 21, 2011 in Davis, California. Thousands of Occupy protestors staged a demonstration on the UC Davis campus to protest the UC Davis police who pepper sprayed students who sat passively with their arms locked during an Occupy Wall Street demonstration on November 18. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

University of California attorneys will be back in court Friday to argue for the public release of a task force report into the pepper spraying of peaceful protesters by UC Davis campus police in November.

The report, ordered by UC President Mark Yudof at the request of UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi, was to be released March 6. However, the release was put on hold when Alameda County Superior Court Judge Evelio M. Grillo granted attorneys representing the campus police union and specific officers involved in the incident a temporary restraining order.

The court will determine at Friday's preliminary injunction hearing whether the hold on the release remains in place pending a trial on the matter, said attorney Mike McGill, who represents officers involved in the case and is general counsel for the Federated University Police Officers Association.

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