So Cal education, LAUSD, the Cal States and the UCs

Audit: LA Unified schools 'could do more' to improve handling of child abuse reports

Miramonte Elementary School

Grant Slater/KPCC

L.A. Unified "could do more to improve its handling of child abuse allegations" and has often failed to follow state law, according to an audit released Thursday. The audit was requested after two teachers at Miramonte Elementary School were arrested for lewd acts on children.

L.A. Unified has often failed to follow state law in its child abuse reporting procedures, delaying some notifications to the agency for teacher credentialing by up to three years, according to a state audit on how the district handles child abuse released Thursday.

Here are the key findings in the 62-page report and the district's six-page response, both of which can be read below:

1) The district didn't always properly notify the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. After a review of claims going back to July 1, 2008, the district submitted 604 cases to the commission in three months. Of these cases, at least 144 were submitted a year or more late; 31 more than three years late.

  • Of the 31 late cases, 23 involved misconduct against a student. According to the report, in one case a teacher's sexual relationship with a student was reported 3.5 years late; "thus, the commission could not promptly determine whether to revoke the teacher's certificate and prevent the teacher from working in other school districts."

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State audit on how LA Unified handles child abuse claims to be released

Protestors march near Miramonte Elementa

AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The results of a state audit on how L.A. Unified handles child abuse claims will be released after an eight-month review of its reporting policies and procedures. Democratic state Assemblyman Ricardo Lara of Bell Gardens requested the audit in March after two teachers at Miramonte Elementary School were arrested for lewd conduct on children and a spate of other reports followed.

The results of a state audit on how L.A. Unified handles child abuse claims is set to be released Thursday morning after an eight-month review of reporting policies and procedures in the nation's seconds-largest school district.

The request for the performance audit was put forward by Democratic state Assemblyman Ricardo Lara of Bell Gardens in March and unanimously approved by the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

Lara asked the committee to perform the audit after two teachers from Miramonte Elementary School were accused of lewd acts on children. L.A. Unified fielded a spate of increased reports after the teachers' arrests in two separate cases.

At the time, Lara said he hoped to get a "comprehensive look at what current policies are in place and identify any lapses or omissions."

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School funding changes debated at educators meeting

California Budget

Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Educators at a private meeting Tuesday sounded off on an expected proposal to increase state funding to disadvantaged school districts. Conversation focused on Governor Jerry Brown's proposal to redistribute education funding pots known as categoricals among districts with high proportions of kids in poverty and English learners.

Educators at a private meeting Tuesday sounded off on an expected proposal to increase state financial support to disadvantaged school districts. The 90-minute meeting was convened in Hawthorne by area State Senator Rod Wright. State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson attended, as did representatives of nearly a dozen public school districts.

The conversation,Wright said, focused on Governor Jerry Brown's proposal to redistribute education funding pots known as categoricals among districts with high proportions of kids in poverty and English learners.

That idea died on the vine earlier this year after a coalition of school district officials and teachers unions opposed it. Inglewood area State Senator Rod Wright said the proposal would pit district against district.

“The problem with that is that if you’re, say, a district like Long Beach then that could hurt you, right? Because Long Beach may not be as disadvantaged as might be, Lawndale,” Wright said.

Wright expects the governor to reintroduce a similar proposal next year. Recent cuts in state education spending have led many educators to call on lawmakers to streamline the state’s ultra-complicated formula for education funding.

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Charter schools chain cut costs and reformed spending to stay open

The head of Inner City Education Foundation - ICEF - Public Schools, Parker Hudnut, detailed cost cutting and major philanthropic help as he described a two-year effort that’s led the 14-campus charter school company on a financial turnaround.

 Hudnut came on board a year and a half ago.  Philanthropists had donated about $10 million to keep the doors open the year before, but that wasn’t enough.

“We had a $2 million payroll due 72 hours after I started, we had $15,000 in the bank and no more money coming in from the state," Hudnut said. "That was my first week on the job."

ICEF laid off 100 employees, changed its spending habits and scrutinized every line item on its budget. Sitting down with principals, Hudnut said, led to a nearly two-thirds cut to ICEF’s $700,000 annual security budget.

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Steve Barr leaves Green Dot board of directors, organization he founded

Steve Barr

Courtesy Green Dot Public Schools

Steve Barr, Founder, Green Dot charter schools

It’s the end of an era. Steve Barr, the founder of the 10,000 student Green Dot charter schools organization, resigned last week from the group’s board of directors, the company announced Monday.

Barr, who stepped down from day-to-day operations in 2009, said other school improvement projects are eating up his time.

“I’m the chair of a board for our school in New York," said Barr. "I’m the chair of the turnaround effort for the school we’re turning around in New Orleans and Green Dot’s board is generally run by an executive committee which I’m not a member of just because I don’t have the time for it."

Green Dot spokesman Gabriel Sanchez said the board of directors didn’t expect Barr’s departure. Barr told the board in an email sent to board chair Marlene Canter. It read, "Please accept my resignation from the board," and nothing else.

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