So Cal education, LAUSD, the Cal States and the UCs

LAUSD must include student test scores in teacher evals by Dec. 4

Lawyers confer on teacher eval Doe vs. Deasy stull act

Tami Abdollah/KPCC

Lawyers for L.A. Unified, United Teachers Los Angeles, Associated Administrators of Los Angeles, and parents filing suit, were sent into the hallway to come up with a timeline for when the district must be in compliance with state law and include student test scores in teacher evaluations.

L.A. Unified must comply with a judge's ruling to include student test scores in teacher evaluations by Dec. 4, a bevy of attorneys representing the district, its unions, and parents agreed in court today.

Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant made his ruling in Doe vs. Deasy last month and asked the attorneys to agree on a compliance timeline. After multiple meetings and disagreements, Chalfant sent the attorneys into the hallway this afternoon to come to an agreement, or face him imposing one unilaterally.

L.A. Unified attorney Barry Green said the district and its unions agreed on a staggered timeline that included a check-in on progress Sept. 4 and a final "drop dead date where everything has to be in place" by Dec. 4.

"We can't just wave our wand and just implement, because we have the unions" to negotiate with, Green said in court today. "We have a gun to us that says we must do that."

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Legal wrangling stalls LAUSD use of student test scores in teacher evals

Jordon Cooper/Flickr (Creative Commons-licensed)

Los Angeles Superior Court

More than a month after a judge ruled that L.A. Unified must include student test scores in teacher evaluations, legal wrangling over even a general timeline continues to stall efforts to bring the district in compliance with state law.

Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant made his ruling in Doe vs. Deasy last month and asked the district, its unions, and the attorney representing parents who brought the suit, to agree on a compliance timeline. Attorneys were to return to court with that timeline today; instead, in multiple court filings over the last six weeks, they continue to disagree over the broadest of details.

"That's 43 days ago, six weeks, where the district is not complying by the law," said Scott Witlin, the attorney who represented parents suing the district in the case. "There doesn't seem to be the requisite urgency to get the district into compliance with the law...Every year this doesn't get done it's another 50,000 kids who've never had their teachers properly evaluated."

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San Bernardino parents win right to fire a local school district thanks to Parent Trigger law

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For the first time, a group using the state’s new “Parent Trigger” law has wrested control of a failing school from administrators.

For the first time, a group using the state’s new “Parent Trigger” law has wrested control of a failing school from administrators.

Although her sixth-grade daughter Vanessa gets really good grades, Doreen Diaz says she’s not sure that means much at Desert Trails Elementary School in San Bernardino County.

“They don’t have very high expectations for the kids,” said Diaz. She says she hopes that’ll change soon.

Under a San Bernardino Superior Court judge’s order, the Adelanto School District must accept a parent petition to take over the troubled school.

The 2-year-old “Parent Trigger” law was the first of its kind in the nation. It enables parents to force the conversion of a struggling traditional school into a charter, shut it down completely or fire its staff. All they need is a petition that 51 percent of parents sign.

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Belmont High, Esteban E. Torres High among LA schools to benefit from $1.7 million in grants

LAUSD board meeting protesters

Tami Abdollah / KPCC

Hundreds of protesters gathered outside L.A. Unified headquarters downtown to protest budget cuts earlier this year.

More than a dozen Los Angeles schools will benefit from $1.7 million in foundation funds as part of a broad national initiative to improve learning opportunities for students from lower-income neighborhoods.

The California Community Foundation announced today that it has received $1.5 million from the Ford Foundation to support additional learning experiences for disadvantaged students. The funds will go to those who may not have access to the music lessons, tutors or sports activities of their more advantaged peers.

"We have 15 million young people in this country who have essentially no adult supervision, and very little to do between the hours of 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. in the afternoon, and also, many of them are kind of footloose in the summertime," said Jeannie Oakes, director of educational opportunity and school scholarship at the Ford Foundation.

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UC regents vow to freeze tuition if Gov's November tax measure passes

LaHood  Announces Funding For Rail Development Project At Port Of Oakland

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The University of California is promising to freeze tuition for the coming academic year if Governor Jerry Brown’s November tax measure is approved.

The University of California is promising to freeze tuition for the coming academic year if Governor Jerry Brown’s November tax measure is approved. 

But the measure’s failure could lead to a 20 percent mid-year increase.

The UC’s carrot-and-stick approach stems from the way the state budget is set up: if Brown’s tax initiative (Proposition 30) passes, and the university freezes its tuition, it would receive an extra $125 million — money the UC hasn’t received in years. 

But if Prop 30 fails, the university would take a $250 million mid-year cut. So President Mark Yudof is warning students that Prop 30 is the only realistic way to keep tuition down.

"They need to know it, their families need to know it and their friends and neighbors need to know it," says Yudof.

The potential 20 percent tuition increase would add up to about $2,500 a student.

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