Pacific Swell

Southern California environment news and trends

Walking in LA: It happens, we can prove it

Walkin’ in LA, nobody walks in LA. Or so say the lyrics from Missing Persons. But guess what? People do walk in the City of Angels, and it happens more than the public thinks. Several recent reports are highlighting this lesser-known truth about our fair city.

First, the Sherman Oaks Patch brought us the good news that it was ranked 42nd in almost 100 neighborhoods around Los Angeles for their walkability score. Walkability score, you say? 

As the Sherman Oak Patch writes, “WalkScore.com, which provided the rankings on their website, determined the scores by measuring the walkability of individual addresses based on proximity to nearby amenities.” 

Why is this relevant? The Patch points out that a high walkability score means several positive things for your neighborhood. For one, your health is improved by the 6 to 10 pounds you weigh less than a person in a sprawling neighborhood. What’s more, one point of Walk Score means $3,000 more for your property value.  

LAist also covered WalkScore.com’s findings. They shared that while L.A.’s overall score was a “mere 66,” Downtown, Koreatown, Mid-City West, Pico-Union, Chinatown, and Hollywood all had “scores for walkability between 87 and 92.” Not bad for a city with a walker’s reputation thought to be a mythical as flying (not walking) unicorns.

How true is all this? I work from home and live in a neighborhood that scored an 88 from the good people at WalkScore. My bank, library, grocery store, preferred movie theatre, restaurants, hiking trails and more are all within blocks of each other. Minutes before writing this article, I was outside scrapping cobwebs off the bottom of my car that had adhered to the street. So walk on, Los Angeles. Walk on.

Want to see how your neighborhood rates? Check out WalkScore.com for details.

Image: intransfer/Flickr

 

 

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