Pacific Swell | Southern California environment news and trends
Local

Biologists spot California’s lone gray wolf



Wolf OR7 and a mate have produced offspring in southwest Oregon’s Cascade Mountains, wildlife biologists confirmed  the week of June 2, 2014. In early May, biologists suspected that OR7, originally from northeast Oregon, had a mate in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest when remote cameras captured several images of what appeared to be a black female wolf in the same area.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) biologists returned to the area Monday and observed two pups. It would be the first known wolves to breed in the Oregon Cascades since the mid-1940s.  Photo by John Stephenson / USFWS
Wolf OR7 and a mate have produced offspring in southwest Oregon’s Cascade Mountains, wildlife biologists confirmed the week of June 2, 2014. In early May, biologists suspected that OR7, originally from northeast Oregon, had a mate in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest when remote cameras captured several images of what appeared to be a black female wolf in the same area. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) biologists returned to the area Monday and observed two pups. It would be the first known wolves to breed in the Oregon Cascades since the mid-1940s. Photo by John Stephenson / USFWS
Photo by USFWS - Pacific Region via Flickr Creative Commons

OR7, the internationally known lone gray wolf that strayed into California from Oregon (presumably looking for a mate) is still calling the golden state home. The wolf, also known as “Journey,” had a close encounter of the human kind when wildlife biologist Richard Shinn spotted (and photographed) the animal in the hills of Modoc County in northern California.

As reported by Pete Thomas Outdoors, Shinn was with a federal trapper and state game warden informing local ranchers that the wolf had been detected in the area on GPS when the sighting occurred.

"There, all of a sudden, out pops a head, and here he is," explained Karen Kovacs of the California Department of Fish and Game, to the Associated Press. "He appeared very healthy."

OR7 was seen and photographed on a hillside from a distance of about 100 yards, and the picture is the first color photo taken of the wolf.