Southern California environment news and trends

County property owners pack supervisors meeting to protest stormwater fee [updated]

stormwater parcel tax

Molly Peterson/KPCC

Some LA county property owners object to a proposed parcel tax considered by the Board of Supervisors.

stormwater parcel tax

Molly Peterson/KPCC

A protester who identified himself as Mike said he would pay more than $10,000 a year for his Santa Clarita property if a proposed stormwater tax goes through.

stormwater parcel tax

Molly Peterson/KPCC

About a dozen Los Angeles County property owners stood on the corner of Temple and Grand streets in downtown LA to protest a proposed stormwater fee.

stormwater parcel tax

Molly Peterson/KPCC

It was standing room only at the LA County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. About 250 people commented on a proposed stormwater fee that the county is considering for property owners.


Update at 5:00 p.m.:

After listening to several hours of testimony, the supervisors decided to continue the hearing until March 12. While voicing concerns about the various objections raised to the proposed tax (and to the proposed vote-by-mail election), the supervisors directed staff to explore other possible ways to raise the money needed for stormwater pollution control.

Hundreds of people jammed the LA County Board of Supervisors meeting today. They came to be heard on a proposed parcel tax that would help fund new stormwater pollution controls.

The tax would cost the average homeowner about fifty dollars a year. The LA Unified School District and some cities don’t like it because they would pay much more than that. 

Today’s hearing has been raucous at times, with homeowners, businesses, school districts and others protesting the process. Santa Clarita councilman TimBen Boydston said the tax would cost his city nearly half a million dollars a year. “I would like to congratulate our council and our august group of men and women here,” he said. “They have managed to do something that people thought was impossible. And that is, God sends us rain, and you figured out how to tax it.” That line got a lot of applause.

Environmental groups and supporters of the county’s plan were outnumbered by opponents, who booed a few speakers who talked about dirty beaches.

Former Heal the Bay chief Mark Gold, now at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, called this Clean Water, Clean Beaches measure “the most important water quality, water supply, and flood control measure that the region has ever seen.” Gold pointed out that the process was a long time coming. “This measure has been negotiated between the cities and the county, and enabled by state legislation, a process that has taken over five years,” he said.

Right now the supervisors are debating whether to delay for 90 days a decision on whether to hold a vote-by-mail election on the parcel tax.

 

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