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Environment & Science

California Drought News: More Brown, less nuts, and boom times for water witches



A tractor moves an uprooted almond tree into a shredder at Baker Farming on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California.  Almond farmer Barry Baker of Baker Farming had 1,000 acres, 20 percent, of his almond trees removed because he doesn't have access to enough water to keep them watered as the California drought continues. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff.
A tractor moves an uprooted almond tree into a shredder at Baker Farming on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. Almond farmer Barry Baker of Baker Farming had 1,000 acres, 20 percent, of his almond trees removed because he doesn't have access to enough water to keep them watered as the California drought continues. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Monday’s news saw March roar in like a lion, precipitation-wise, over the weekend. 

Brave environmental experts are speaking up, saying that the fields now covered in nut trees need to lie fallow to conserve water. I say brave, because this would mean letting a cash-rich crop die. While the world market is screaming for more nuts there's likely to be very little appetite to do the right thing ecologically. (The Guardian

If you’ve got an intuition about drought news, share it with us in the comments.