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Environment & Science

California Drought News: Drying up school attendance



In this file photo, a sprinkler system sprays crops with water in the Imperial Valley. The Imperial Valley benefits from being an early adopter of taking water from the Colorado River, receiving 3.1 million acre-feet of water a year, compared to 1.1 million for the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, according to the Seattle Times.
In this file photo, a sprinkler system sprays crops with water in the Imperial Valley. The Imperial Valley benefits from being an early adopter of taking water from the Colorado River, receiving 3.1 million acre-feet of water a year, compared to 1.1 million for the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, according to the Seattle Times.
Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Thursday's drought fortune cookie says, "Dry times bring rare unity." But since that's not very predictive, we crack open another which reads, "You will someday water your ficus with water from your whites."

In the meantime...

In water law, one rule is supreme: “First in time, first in right.”

As a result, Imperial County, with a population of 175,000, gets 3.1 million acre-feet of water a year. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, serving 19 million people, gets about 1.1 million acre-feet. (Seattle Times)

The Sites reservoir (technically known as the North of the Delta Offstream Storage project) would be capable of holding up to 1.9 million acre-feet of water, yielding 470,000 to 640,000 acre-feet of water for various uses. LaMalfa and Garamendi’s bill would accelerate a feasibility study years in the making and automatically authorize the project once the U.S. Department of the Interior reviews the study. (Sacramento Bee)