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Is sitting really the new smoking?



If you work in an office, what tactics have you employed to reduce the amount of time you sit during the day?
If you work in an office, what tactics have you employed to reduce the amount of time you sit during the day?
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I read every anti-sitting story with trepidation.

I do what I can to live a healthy lifestyle, but my job requires a lot of chair time. Over the years, I've tried to accept that death-by-sitting is a necessary evil of my beloved career choice.

But an article by Sacramento Bee health reporter Cynthia Craft makes me rethink my reluctant acceptance of extended sitting.

"Sitting is the new smoking," Craft writes, because, "both are habits that are within our physical capabilities to stop."

Wait, this sitting-at-a-desk thing is just a bad habit I've developed?

Craft continues:

"Like smoking, cardiovascular experts say, the decision to sit is our own. It's preventable. It's deliberate. We can quit it."

And the reasons to quit sitting are extensive, Craft writes: It slows our brain function and increases our risk of cardiovascular disease.

But if you - like me - work in an office, is it really possible to not sit so much?

Craft offers tips from health experts, including:

"… walk every 45 minutes, holding "walking meetings" and installing treadmill desks or standing desks with computer screens at eye level (just standing can burn off 40 more calories an hour)."

Video: This is how KPCC's treadmill desk works!

I’m reminded of an anti-smoking campaign aimed at youth, called “Kick Butts Day.” Maybe it will take a "Kick Your Butt" day to get us out of our chairs?

If you sit all day in the office, have you adopted any of these healthier habits? What other tactics have you employed to reduce the amount of time you sit during the day? Have you noticed a difference - physically or in your ability to work productively and creatively?

Tell us about it in the comments section below, or e-mail us at Impatient@scpr.org.