Short Nosed Dogs More Prone to Death In Flight

Bulldog and pug owners beware: Short-snouted breeds accounted for roughly half the purebred dog deaths on airplanes in the past five years. Overall, at least 122 dog deaths were reported since May 2005, when U.S. airlines were required to start disclosing them. The dogs died while being shipped as cargo.

English bulldogs account for the single highest number of deaths among the 108 purebreds on the list: 25. Pugs were next, with 11 deaths, followed by golden retrievers and labradors, with seven
deaths each, French bulldogs with six, and American Staffordshire terriers, four.

The head of the Bulldog Club of America's health committee says short nosed breeds have a skull formation that affects their airways. Dan Bandy says "The way all dogs cool themselves is basically through respiration, either just panting or the action of breathing in or out, is a method of heat exchange for them. A dog that has a long snout or a long muzzle has more surface area within
its nasal cavity for that heat exchange to take place. So breeds like labradors or collies or those types of dogs with the long muzzles have a more efficient cooling system."

In all, 144 pet deaths were reported by airlines over the past five years, along with 55 injuries and 33 lost pets. You can get the details at Dogs.

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