How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: Congess split over migrant children, Jeb Bush's op-ed, American-born gangs, more

Jeb Bush Testifies At House Hearing On Free Enterprise And Economic Growth

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Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush testifies before a House committee. The potential presidential candidate is urging fellow Republicans to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

To Cope With Child Immigrants, Competing Plans Emerge From Congress - NPR The Republican-led House and Democratic-dominated Senate are not surprisingly split over how to handle the influx of child migrants at the border. The House is concentrating on changing a 2008 anti-human trafficking law that makes it difficult to immediately deport anyone from a non-contiguous country (most of these children are coming from Central America.) Senate Democrats are standing firm on keeping the law as is, saying these children deserve a chance to seek asylum. But both the House and Senate plan on giving the president less money than the $3.7 million he's requested.

The Solution to Border Disorder (Op-ed)- Wall Street Journal Former Florida governor and potential 2016 presidential candidate Jeb Bush has written an op-ed column encouraging fellow Republicans to show "compassion" for the migrant children but not let it become an excuse to delay comprehensive immigration reform.  Bush, who co-authored the piece with Clint Bolick of the Goldwater Institute, said Republicans must show leadership before President Obama uses executive action.

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In immigration news: More young children at the border, controversy over migrant youth shelter, border crisis vs. executive action, more

Children detainees sleep in a holding cell at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in Brownsville,Texas.

Eric Gay/AP

Child detainees sleep in a holding cell at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in Brownsville,Texas. According to a new analysis of government data, the share of unaccompanied minor children 12 and younger arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border has jumped from 9 percent in 2013 to 16 percent this year so far.

On Immigration, America's Concerns Are Fiery But Fleeting - NPR In a recently released Gallup poll, 17 percent of respondents named  immigration as "America's most pressing issue, narrowly topping concerns that weigh more consistently on the nation's mindset, like jobs and political leadership." It was a jump from the 5 percent who said the same thing in June, before the story of unaccompanied migrant youths at the border became national news. But the polling reflects past political flare-ups over immigration.

Report: More kids 12 and under arriving at US-Mexico border - Southern California Public Radio An analysis of government data shows that the share of unaccompanied children 12 and younger arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border is on the rise: "In fiscal year 2013, which ended last Sept. 30, nine percent of unaccompanied child migrants were 12 and younger; since last October through the end of May, 16 percent were 12 and younger."

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Report: More kids 12 and under arriving at US-Mexico border

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

A poster that is part of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection information campaign targeted at countries where a lot of minors traveling to the U.S. originate. It translates to: “I thought it would be easy for my son to get his papers in the North. That wasn’t true.” According to a new analysis of government data, the share of children 12 and younger making the journey has increased.

The share of young children children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border on their own has gone up, according to analysis by the Pew Research Center.

A tally of government data obtained through a Freedom of Information Act shows that more kids 12 and under are being apprehended as unaccompanied minors - many of them fleeing violence in Central America - continue to make the journey to the United States.

In fiscal year 2013, which ended last Sept. 30, nine percent of unaccompanied child migrants were 12 and younger; since last October through the end of May, 16 percent were 12 and younger. From the report:

The new data show a 117% increase in the number of unaccompanied children ages 12 and younger caught at the U.S.-Mexico border this fiscal year compared with last fiscal year. By comparison, the number of apprehensions of unaccompanied teenagers ages 13-17 has increased by only 12% over the same time period.

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Former 'comfort women' tour SoCal, call attention to WW II sex slavery

Comfort women in LA

Josie Huang/KPCC

Ok-Seon Lee (l.) and Il-Chul Kang (r.) are touring the U.S. calling attention to the plight of former sex slaves during World War II known as 'comfort women.' Their first stop was in L.A. to file declarations of support for a monument to comfort women in Glendale.

Comfort women in LA

Josie Huang/KPCC

Phyllis Kim is the executive director of the Korean American Forum of California, and will be accompanying the two former 'comfort women' on their U.S. tour.

Comfort women in LA

Josie Huang/KPCC

Ok-Seon Lee, 87, is one of 54 surviving 'comfort women' in Korea, according to the Korean-American Forum of California.


A lawsuit to remove a monument to World War II sex slaves in Glendale took on a new twist this week when two former ‘comfort women’ visiting the U.S. offered declarations of support in the federal court case. 

Both Il-Chul Kang and Ok-Seon Lee recount how as teens, they were abducted by Japanese soldiers to work as sex slaves. Now they’re in their late 80s, sloped in shoulder and slow-moving.

Outside federal court in downtown L.A., Kang said despite their condition, it was important they come to the US to show their appreciation for the Glendale monument, and others like it.  

"Thank you for erecting the peace monument and thank you for trying to protect the peace monument," Kang told a group of reporters, mostly from Korean-language news outlets.

About a year ago, Glendale worked with local non-profit, Korean American Forum of California to install a bronze statue of a young comfort woman in a public park, becoming the first city on the West Coast to do so.  In February, a group of conservative older Japanese-Americans who challenge the internationally-accepted history about comfort women sued the city, demanding the statue’s removal. 

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In immigration news: Illegal immigration still low, human smugglers laundering money, Latinos still feeling recession, more

US-MIGRATION-SECURITY-BORDER

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

The fence along the U.S.-Mexico border between the Otay Mesa and San Ysidro ports of entry in and near San Diego, California, across from Tijuana, Mexico. In spite of the recent crush of Central American minors and families arriving at the border, illegal immigration overall is still low compared with the all-time high seen in 2000.

Despite Crush of Children, Illegal Immigration Low - Associated Press A reality check as Central American minors and families arrive at the border: "In the last budget year, Border Patrol agents arrested about 420,000 people, most of them along the Mexican border. That followed a three-year trend of near record low numbers of apprehensions...The number of people being arrested at the border remains dramatically lower than the all-time high of more than 1.6 million people in 2000."

U.S. investigators focus on money laundering linked to border crisis - Los Angeles Times From the story: "Agents from the Department of Homeland Security and the Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, or FinCEN, are targeting suspicious patterns of deposits and withdrawals through 'funnel accounts' held at U.S. banks, according to two federal law enforcement officials who were not authorized to speak publicly about the topic. Human-smuggling rings are using such bank transactions to fund their activities, officials said."

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