How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: DHS watchdog under fire, ‘modest’ deportation changes, preserving ‘The Mission’

Cesar Chavez Birthday

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Men walk underneath a mural depicting Cesar Chavez along Cesar Chavez street in the Mission District of San Francisco.

Probe: DHS watchdog cozy with officials, altered reports as he sought top job – Washington Post  A new report released today by a Congressional oversight panel found that an acting Department of Homeland Security inspector general behaved improperly during his tenure and that "any report generated out of his office would be suspect.” Charles K. Edwards, who served from 2011 through 2013, "routinely shared drinks and dinner with department leaders and gave them inside information about the timing and findings of investigation," according to the story. Edwards resigned his post and was granted his request to be transferred to DHS' office of science and technology.

Obama Easing on Immigrant Deportations Expected to Be Modest – Wall Street Journal Activists have been hopeful that the White House will put a stop to deportations, after the president said that he wanted immigration laws to be enforced more "humanely." But sources for the WSJ say that the outcome of the review will feel 'modest' and "fall far short of demands by many activists to give safe harbor to millions of undocumented immigrants."

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Filipino gun culture has deep roots

Filipino gun club

Todd Johnson

Claudia Vidanes aims a Phantom Strike AR-15, a custom gun designed by her father Jojo Vidanes, president of the Norco Running Gun club.

Filipino gun club

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Brian Urbano, 32, of Anaheim cleans his pistols after shooting with fellow members of the Running Gun Club in Norco.

Filipino Gun Club

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Norco Running Gun club president Jojo Vidanes runs through one of the stages that he designed at Raahauge's Shooting Park.

Filipino gun club

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A Norco Running Gun team member runs through a stage during practice at Raahauge's Shooting Park.

Filipino Gun Club

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Chee Kwan describes elements of the bullets he shoots at a Norco Running Gun club practice.

Filipino Gun Club

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Chee Kwan target shoots during practice at Raahauge's Shooting Park.

Filipino gun club

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Shooters must read and sign the safety rules before entering Raahauge's Shooting Park, which hosts Running Gun and other clubs.

Filipino gun club

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Jojo Vidanes, center right, stands with teammates in front of his 1986 military Humvee.

Filipino gun club

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Claudia Vidanes gives her friend, Justin Cao, his first shooting lesson.

Filipino gun club

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The team collects spent casings to be recycled and made into new bullets.


At an outdoor shooting range in a houseless expanse of Corona, wind whips dust into the air. A bright sun beats down on necks.

Brian Urbano doesn’t mind the conditions. He’s enjoying his favorite pastime.

"We — my culture, my heritage, my roots — we do embrace firearms," Urbano said.

Urbano is a member of the Norco Running Gun club, a predominantly Filipino-American group of more than 500 shooters from all over Southern California.

About 80 have shown up today at the range housed at Raahauge's Shooting Enterprises for a weekly competition that has shooters running through obstacle courses, shooting at paper and metal targets.

In the U.S., the vast majority of gun owners are white and male. The picture is very different at the Norco club where the president is a Filipino immigrant and members banter in Tagalog about technique and gun models.

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In immigration news: Republicans for reform, lawyers sue for court access, fitness for diverse neighbors

In Immigration News

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Illinois GOP rep Aaron Schock broke from the party ranks in calling for a path to citizenship for immigrants in the country illegally.

218: Kinzinger, Schock Plead for Immigration Overhaul - Roll Call Immigration reform may be anathema to Republicans in other states, but not in Illinois.  On Tuesday, both Reps. Adam Kinzinger and Aaron Schock each gave video testimonials for reform. The vidoes were played at a pro-immigration event sponsored by the Illinois Business Immigration Coalition which also featured another prominent Republican, former Speaker J. Dennis Hastert. Shock was the most demonstrative in his support, saying that “We need a clear path to citizenship for workers who are already here and a fair and efficient on-ramp for those who want to come here.” A reform bill passed the Senate last summer, and has been stalled in the House ever since.

Moderate Dems resist Obama on deportations - Politico  Within the Democrat party there's a divide over whether the president should stop deportations. Some moderate Democrats such as Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas say it's Congress' purview to change immigration law, not Obama's. Illinois Rep. Dan Lipinski, on the other hand, wants immigration reform but doesn't like the bill that's pending in Congress because, according to the story, "he doesn’t think it would do enough to stem illegal migration into the United States. He predicted that executive action on deportations would “cause more problems” than it would solve."

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In immigration news: Deportation policy changes weighed, Michigan affirmative action ban upheld, more

Mercer 20391

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Guatemalan immigrants are body searched before boarding a deportation flight to Guatemala City, Guatemala on June 24, 2011 in Mesa, Arizona. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is reportedly considering limiting the deportations of people without serious criminal records, as the agency reviews its deportation practices.

DHS may limit deportations of illegal immigrants - CBS News  Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is reportedly considering limiting the deportations of people without serious criminal records, as the agency reviews its deportation practices. From the story: "The potential change could shield tens of thousands of immigrants now removed each year solely because of repeated immigration violations, such as re-entering the country after being deported."

Immigration reform: If Obama moves on his own, how big a political risk? - Christian Science Monitor If Homeland Security limits deportations of people without serious criminal records, political fallout could come from different directions. From the story: "Such a move would fall short of the larger changes pro-immigrant activists are hoping for...At the same time, any unilateral move by the administration that grants new rights to certain illegal immigrants would likely anger Republicans, who accuse Obama of abusing his executive powers."

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In immigration news: Supreme Court declines to revive part of SB 1070, more Latinos admitted to UC system, more

Kaufmann Hall

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Kerckhoff Hall on the UCLA campus. Preliminary admittance numbers show that for the first time, the University of California system has admitted more Latino California residents as freshmen than non-Latino white state residents.

Supreme Court declines to revive Arizona immigration law - Reuters The high court has decided not to hear an appeal from the state of Arizona to revive a provision in SB 1070, a controversial 2010 state measure, that would criminalize harboring and transporting immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally. Supreme Court justices upheld other parts of SB 1070 in 2012.

More Latino than white students admitted to UC schools - Associated Press For the first time, the University of California system has admitted more Latino California resident students than non-Latino white residents. From the story: "Preliminary admissions data show that 17,589 Latino students have been accepted as freshmen at one of the University of California's nine undergraduate campuses for the fall, or 29 percent of all 61,120 in-state applicants who were offered a spot. That compares to 16,378 white residents, who made up 27 percent of the admitted applicants."

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