How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

Survey says: Latinos still favor Obama, and his same-sex marriage stance makes little difference

Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP/GettyImages)

President Barack Obama at a campaign event in Redwood City, Calif., May 23, 2012

A conservative group is capitalizing on President Obama's less-than-popular record on immigration as a way to appeal to Latino voters, while Republican candidate-apparent Mitt Romney is talking up the economy as an alternate way of reaching out to Latinos. But in spite of all this, a new poll suggests that Romney still has much ground to cover.

Released by NBC, the Wall Street Journal and Telemundo, the poll shows 61 percent of 300 Latino adults surveyed earlier this month supporting Obama for reelection, versus 27 percent who support Romney. Among other things, a majority of respondents gave Obama the thumbs-up for his handling of the economy. And as for his recently-stated position in support of same-sex marriage, that didn't appear to make much of a difference.

A few highlighted questions and results from the poll:

And, if the next election for president were held today, and...Mitt Romney were the Republican candidate and Barack Obama were the Democratic candidate, for whom would you vote?

Mitt Romney ....................................................... 27

Barack Obama ................................................... 61

Depends (VOL) ................................................ 2

Neither/other (VOL) .......................................... 5

Not sure............................................................ 5


Forty-one percent said Obama had brought the "right kind of change to the country," versus 15 percent who said it was the "wrong kind of change." Respondents were somewhat split on Romney, with 24 percent saying he'd bring the "right kind of change," 27 percent saying he'd bring the wrong kind, and most (38 percent) saying he'd "not bring much change either way."

On the much-debated topic of same-sex marriage, the poll results were pretty much in line with similar surveys. The majority of those who were registered voters said Obama's position didn't make much difference in terms of how they'd vote:

Would you be more likely to vote for...Barack Obama because he supports same-sex marriage, Mitt Romney because he opposes same-sex marriage – or does this not make much difference in how you might vote? ...And, would you be much more likely to vote for (Barack Obama because he supports/Mitt Romney because he opposes) same-sex marriage, or just somewhat more likely?

Much more likely vote for Barack Obama.......................... 16

Somewhat more likely vote for Barack Obama ................. 6

Somewhat more likely vote for Mitt Romney ..................... 5

Much more likely vote for Mitt Romney ............................. 10

No difference in vote ....................................................... 58

Depends (VOL) ............................................................... -

Not sure........................................................................... 5

+ Results shown reflect responses among registered voters.


The president's support of same-sex marriage made less of a difference among those registered voters who identified themselves as Obama supporters.

The entire poll results can be viewed here.

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