How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In the news this morning: A different kind of migrant shelter, undocumented entrepreneurs, the struggles of immigrant veterans, more

In Mexicali, a haven for broken lives - Los Angeles Times An old, formerly grand hotel in the border town of Mexicali is now a migrant shelter, the Hotel of the Deported Migrant. Deportees from the U.S. with nowhere to go sometimes stay long-term, working there as cooks, cleaners or security guards.

I'm a successful entrepreneur but might get deported - CNN Money Undocumented status pushes some immigrants to work for themselves, and some have become quite successful as entrepreneurs. But increasingly strict state laws have made it more difficult for these small businesses to prosper.

Woman Adopted As Baby Faces Deportation To India - CBS Denver A woman who was adopted from India when she was three months old is fighting deportation; her adoptive mother died before she was able to make her a citizen as a child.

Illegal immigrants find paths to college, careers – USA Today Some undocumented college graduates are finding creative ways to get round roadblocks following graduation, including working as independent contractors.

Hundreds from across state protest immigration law - Montgomery Advertiser Hundreds protested in Montgomery, Alabama this weekend against the passage and signing of HB 658, the latest version of Alabama’s strict HB 56 anti-illegal immigration law. Critics of the changes say they are too minimal.

Minority numbers in the military grow, but minority vets face a complex set of issues - Southern California Public Radio Military veterans who are immigrants sometimes face more complicated problems upon returning to civilian life, such as in navigating educational, health and other benefits.

Epithet that divides Mexicans is banned by Oxnard school district - Los Angeles Times The Oxnard school district has banned students' use of the epithet "Oaxaquita," or "little Oaxacan," a term used to demean indigenous Mexicans.

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