How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: Senate bill may (or may not) land this week, debate over low-skilled workers, legacy of amnesty, more

Drought Forces Water Cutbacks To Southern California Farms

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A south-bound train passes farm workers in the Coachella Valley near Mecca, Calif. Disagreement over a planned low-skilled guest worker program and visa could present a snag as Congress debates immigration reform.

Critical week in Senate for gun and immigration bills - New York Times Legislation on both is expected now that Congress has returned from spring break, but along with gun legislation, a Senate immigration bill "could slip to next week amid hard negotiations, especially over the scope of the guest-worker program."

Immigration reform: The coming fight over the low-skilled worker visa - TIME What's become known as the prospective "W-visa," for low-skilled foreign workers, emerged as the product of a deal between  the AFL-CIO and the Chamber of Commerce during Senate immigration reform negotiations. But there's plenty of opposition, including from unions and business groups. 

Immigration debate: 5 things to watch - Politico Among them: "Conservatives could bolt. The already tenuous relationship between the business and labor communities could fray. Key Republican proponents, like Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Rep. Raul Labrador of Idaho, will face pressure from the right flank." And if a bill finally emerges, disagreements "could upend the whole effort." 

Immigration reform: What the last 'path to citizenship' did for immigrants - Christian Science Monitor A look at how the nearly 3 million immigrants who legalized under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act benefited from permanent legal status and the ability to naturalize as citizens.

Immigrants' voices: Would-be border crosses share their stories - Arizona Republic Stories from a spot in Nogales, Sonora, where "migrants trying to cross north meet recent deportees, as both await aid from a local humanitarian agency. Their stories - some rueful, some desperate - share a common thread: If you can’t go legally, getting to and staying in the United States is tougher than ever."
 

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