How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: Reform plans face challenge in House, Senate amendment benefits Filipino vets, visa overstays, more

Orbitz Names LAX As Busiest Airport For 2011 Thanksgiving Travel

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Travelers at Los Angeles International Airport, November 2011. It's estimated that as many as 40 percent of the nation's unauthorized immigrants arrived legally in the U.S., many flying in with temporary visas, and stayed after their visas expired.

Will immigration reform get killed in Republican-led House? - Reuters From the story: "House Republicans are far from convinced by arguments from party leaders that passage of the bill would help Republicans draw support from Hispanic voters. Many also believe any kind of amnesty for the estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the United States illegally is just plain wrong."

Immigrant measure still backed by gays - New York Times While many were upset by the exclusion of an amendment to the Senate immigration bill that would have granted immigration rights to same-sex binational couples, gay and lesbian advocates say they still support the bill.

Immigration proposal shortens wait for Filipino veterans' children - Southern California Public Radio An amendment that quietly made it into the Senate immigration bill last week would exempt the adult children of Filipino WWII veterans from long waits for an immigrant visa; many surviving veterans who were granted U.S. citizenship are still sponsoring their children.

One-way trips to U.S. frustrate immigration authorities - Los Angeles Times Many unauthorized immigrants in the United States didn't sneak across a border, but came legally on a temporary visa. From the story: "An estimated 4.4 million people entered the country on legal visas and have never left. Officials often have no way of knowing whether they do."

How do low-skilled workers fit into equation of immigration reform? - PBS NewsHour On the history of low-skilled imported labor in the United States, and how the Senate immigration reform bill plans to deal with lower-skilled, lower-paid workers.

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