How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

#ProjectCitizen: Take our sample U.S. citizenship test. Would you qualify?

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Immigrants wait for their citizenship interviews at a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in New York. They must pass a two-part test on English and civics.

This is one part in a new KPCC series looking at the rights, responsibilities, traditions and privileges that come along with being a citizen. Let us know what you think.

To become a U.S. citizen, all immigrants must pass a naturalization test.

But native-born residents do not need to pass the test. Which led us to wonder: How many existing citizens would pass the test if they had to? (It takes five years from the time an immigrant receives a green card — i.e. becomes a permanent legal resident — until he or she may apply to become a naturalized citizen.)

We've created a quiz, below, with sample questions of the type that appear on the actual naturalization test. Try it out and see if you'd pass. Let us know in the comments and be honest!

Becoming a naturalized citizen is a two-part process, in which applicants are tested on their English and on civics. The rules are more flexible for older applicants, but in general, it goes like this: During their naturalization interview, people are tested on how well they can read, write and speak English, as judged by a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services officer.

In the civics portion of the test, they must correctly answer at least six out of 10 questions.

RELATED#ProjectCitizen: What does citizenship mean? 

USCIS selects the questions for each test from a list of 100. While replicating the English test would be difficult to do, we've taken that 100-question list and drawn from it our own civics test for you to try. Some of the questions are pretty straightforward. Others may surprise you. 

Can you get 12 out of 20 correct? Your score (and the answers) will appear when you're  finished.

Beyond civics and history, what cultural/historical/questions do you think are missing from the test? Let us know your suggestions in the comment section or by tweeting us using the #ProjectCitizen hashtag.

We'll create a new "citizenship" test with your suggestions.

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