How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: No unauthorized population increase in CA, a possible reform bill from Pelosi, detention contractors, more

TO GO WITH AFP STORY "Tijuana: A City Un

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A U.S. Border Patrol arrests a migrant trying to cross illegally at the border fence in San Ysidro, Calif. in 2007, a during which the U.S. population of unauthorized immigrants peaked. A new report suggests that after years of decline, this population may be back on the rise. But this isn't reflected in data from California, which has lost some of its popularity as a destination.

Report: Illegal immigration may be rising, but not in California - Southern California Public Radio A new Pew Hispanic Center report suggests that for the first time in several years, the number of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally may be on the rise after dropping in the latter part of the last decade. But this isn't reflected in data from California. The state has lost some of its popularity as a destination over the years as more newcomers head to the Midwest and South

Nancy Pelosi may introduce immigration reform bill - Politico After little progress on immigration reform in the House, California Democrat and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi may soon introduce legislation "combining the comprehensive bill that passed the Senate Judiciary Committee in May with a bipartisan border-security bill from the House Homeland Security Committee." Sources familiar with the plan say it could be released to coincide with  a "National Day of Action" on Oct. 5.

Congress mandates private jail beds for 34,000 immigrants - Bloomberg On the booming immigrant detention industry: "Under law, taxpayers must pay to keep 34,000 people...in jail, at a cost of about $120 each per day, even as the number of immigrants caught sneaking across the border has fallen by more than half since the past recession began." Many of these immigrants are housed in detention centers run by private contractors.

Temporary visa opens up world for young immigrant - USA Today Since it began in August of 2012, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, has allowed more than 565,000 young immigrants to receive a two-year reprieve from deportation.: "The permits are offered under a year-old federal program for people ages 15 to 30 who have grown up in the U.S., but arrived illegally in the country as children."

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