How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: S-Comm backlash, Asians boost Irvine real estate market, a 'Turbo Tax' for immigration forms, more

Ruxandra Guidi/KPCC

Supporters of the so-called "Trust Act" rally outside the L.A. County Men's Central Jail in 2012. The measure, which is awaiting approval from Gov. Jerry Brown, would limit who state and local police can hold for deportation at the request of federal immigration agents.

Backlash grows against federal immigration screening in jails - USA Today On California's 'Trust Act' and other efforts around the country to reduce participation in Secure Communities, a federal immigration enforcement program that allows fingerprints of people booked in local jails to be shared with immigration officials.

SF supes pass ordinance opposing immigration hold requests - KTVU San Francisco is among the cities that have tried to limit participation in Secure Communities. On Tuesday, the city's Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a measure that would prevent local law enforcement from complying with federal requests for immigration detainers.

House Democrats crafting immigration proposal - New York Times More on a strategy being pushed by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, which would combine an earlier version of the Senate's immigration reform plan with an existing House GOP border security bill.

Irvine's Asian population booms, boosting the local real estate market - Southern California Public Radio Irvine, Calif. is a hot real estate market, thanks in large part to a growing number of Asian homebuyers: "Asians and Asian-Americans account for 39 percent of the city's population, up 10 percent from the decade before, according to the 2010 census. They've helped turn Irvine into the fastest-growing major city in California."

Immigration reform is on life support, but it isn't dead yet - Washington Post A rundown of three different scenarios which could lead to a compromise on immigration reform this fall, even if the prospects for an overhaul have dimmed since the summer.

Building a 'Turbo Tax' to streamline immigration paperwork - Bloomberg Businessweek A company founded by a former immigration official "has concluded a beta-testing period and is pitching a plain-language, step-by-step process for completing H1-B visa, green card, citizenship, and other common immigration paperwork. Users follow a series of prompts to complete documents in English or Spanish, then print forms and mail them in."

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