How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: Reform and the coming year, immigrants hesitate on insurance, aftermath of Alabama's HB 56, more

Kitty Felde/KPCC

Immigration reform demonstrators hold signs in Washington, D.C., October 8, 2013.

From hope to anger on immigration reform - Philadelphia Inquirer On how the promise of comprehensive immigration reform at the beginning of 2013 fell flat by the end of the year. Aside from the political impasse in the House, other obstacles included the debate over the Affordable Care Act, the federal debt ceiling and the civil war in Syria.

Budget deal may clear decks for immigration in January - USA Today From the story: "The Senate is expected to pass Tuesday a bipartisan budget deal for the next two years that would clear the legislative calendar and eliminate the threat of a government shutdown in January." This could clear the way for immigration talks to resume in early 2014, although the upcoming primaries may not make for an ideal political climate.

Pelosi hits Obama on deportations - The Hill House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said in an interview with the Telemundo that she thinks "there is discretion in the law as to the implementation, enforcement of the legislation that is calling for these deportations...And I myself, coming from San Francisco … have seen deportations that were totally unjustified.”

Many immigrants hesitate to seek health insurance - Associated Press From the story: "Of the nearly 40 million people living in the U.S. who were born elsewhere, about a third do not have health insurance, according to census data." However, some are still hesitant to sign up for government subsidized health insurance, for numerous reasons. Some fear drawing attention to family members who are in the U.S. illegally, even if they aren't eligible.

How America's harshest immigration law failed - MSNBC On what became of Alabama's stringent HB 56, a 2011 state law whose "most far-reaching elements have proved unconstitutional, unworkable, or politically unsustainable. Elected officials, social workers, clergy, activists, and residents say an initial immigrant evacuation that roiled their communities ended long ago. Many who fled have returned to their old homes."

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