How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: The 2014 debate begins, SB 1070 correspondence, black immigrants, visa backlogs, more

Farmworkers Mobilize In Miami For Immigration Reform

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Immigration reform supporters rally in Miami, Florida on August 16, 2013. House Speaker John Boehner has indicated that he'll support immigration reform this year, but the passage of a comprehensive package in Congress remains a long shot.

Reframing the immigration conversation for 2014 - NPR From the intro: "As Congress returns from winter break, Speaker of the House John Boehner has called comprehensive immigration reform a priority. Host Michel Martin talks with immigration policy advocates Mark Krikorian and Ali Noorani about the political prospects for reform this year."

Judge allows access to emails about Arizona immigration law - Los Angeles Times A federal judge in Arizona has given opponents of SB 1070, Arizona's strict 2010 anti-illegal immigration law, access to emails and other correspondence between the law's supporters and lawmakers "to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages." A key portion of the law that allows police to check for immigration status was upheld in 2012 by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Long waits for would-be immigrants, not for others - ABC News Immigration backlogs, addressed in Q&A form. One good example of how long it takes some to obtain a green card is Sergio Garcia, who was just granted a law license in California although he is in the country illegally. Garcia has been waiting for his green card since 1994, and may still not receive it for a few years more.

Africans, Caribbeans ignored in immigration fight - The Root  According to population stats, "it is black immigrants who...comprise nearly 10 percent of the total foreign-born population." But with much of the attention in the immigration reform debate placed on Latinos and their votes, "you'd never know that based on the pre-baked parameters of the current debate."

Even from state's best high schools, Latinos mostly go to community college - Southern California Public Radio From the story: "According to findings in a recent USC study, 46 percent of Latinos who graduated from California's top public high schools ended up enrolling in a community college after graduation. These schools had the highest Academic Performance Index scores in the state."

Immigration puts small town on cultural divide - Boston Globe On the small town of Mattawa, Washington, where "the majority of people in this American town hundreds of miles from the southern border are not American citizens," leaving its mostly Latino residents with little power to address social and other problems that affect the community.

blog comments powered by Disqus