Multi-American | How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: 'Documented' opens, diversity visa, computer breakdown



Former Washington Post and San Francisco Chronicle reporter Jose Antonio Vargas speaks at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 11, 2011 in San Francisco, California.  Vargas, an illegal immigrant who recently came out in an article in the New York Times Magazine, spoke in conversation with Hearst Newspapers Editor at Large Phil Bronstein about his life as an illegal immigrant and how he was able to work for major U.S. newspapers.
Former Washington Post and San Francisco Chronicle reporter Jose Antonio Vargas speaks at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 11, 2011 in San Francisco, California. Vargas, an illegal immigrant who recently came out in an article in the New York Times Magazine, spoke in conversation with Hearst Newspapers Editor at Large Phil Bronstein about his life as an illegal immigrant and how he was able to work for major U.S. newspapers.
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'Documented' profiles award-winning reporter's revelation of illegal status - Southern California Public Radio It's been three years since Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Jose Antonio Vargas revealed that he's been living in the US illegally since he came to the country as a 12-year-old. He talks to KPCC's Leslie Berestein Rojas about his new documentary film, which is opening today, and about his life and the aftermath of his announcement, during which he became one of the country's leading voices on immigration reform.

African immigrants worry with elimination of Diversity Visa - KALW Immigrants from African countries are worried about how the demise of the Diversity Immigrant Lottery Visa could affect friends and family back home. The point of the lottery is to bring immigrants from countries of origin underrepresented in the US such as African nations. But critics such as Republican Senator Bob Goodlatte of Virginia say that "nothing would prevent terrorist organizations or foreign intelligence agencies from having members apply for the program who do not have criminal backgrounds." African immigrants said that end of the program is sending an unwelcome message.

Computer hardware failure in immigration courts snarling some cases - Dallas Morning News Computer problems are bogging down cases in immigration courts around the country. Immigration lawyers fear that their clients may have to stay longer in detention as a result. Just in Dallas, there was a backlog of about 5,600 cases for five judges.  The Executive Office for Immigration Review refers to the problem as "a hardware failure.”

In a first for Orange County, Latinos lead two largest police departments - Southern Califorina Public Radio Orange County's shifted demographics are being reflected in the leadership of its largest police departments. Just this year, officials in two biggest cities - Anaheim and Santa Ana - have appointed their first Latino police chiefs. Both cities are majority-Latino: Santa Ana is 78 percent Latino; in Anaheim, it's 53 percent. Orange County itself is now more than a third Latino.