How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

More over @MexicanMitt, your new rival speaks French - sort of

Photo by Alexandra Moss/Flickr (Creative Commons)

The "attack croissant" of the Twitter parody?

Move over, @MexicanMitt. There's another bilingual Mitt Romney parody on Twitter now, and this one speaks (quelle horreur!) French. Sort of.

@LeVraiMitt ("the true Mitt") joined the Twitter meme ranks this morning and, like @Mexican Mitt, is steadily gaining followers and press coverage. Why French, one might ask?

Unlike the former meme, which seizes on Romney's Mexican roots (his father, a descendant of American Mormons who moved south in the 19th century, was born in the state of Chihuahua), this one seizes on the GOP presidential primary front-runner's limited command of French, picked up while living briefly in France as a Mormon missionary.

But just the fact that Romney made attempts at using French publicly has been enough for rival Newt Gingrich's campaign to blast him for it. In a recent ad painting the former Massachusetts governor as yet another too-liberal politico from that state, the voice-over says ominously: "and just like John Kerry...he speaks French, too!”

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The cultural mashup dictionary: Tweecanos

Photo by TexasT/Flickr (Creative Commons)


I've never met @xicano007, but a tweet from this East L.A. blogger and sports card collector brings us yet another entry for our evolving dictionary of cultural mashup terms: tweecanas and tweecanos.

Here's how it was used, in a tweet from yesterday mentioning an upcoming performance by Aztlan Underground:

RT @xicano007: Next Saturday at the BLVD in BOYLE HEIGHTS join @Aztlanug @laloalcaraz & some tweecanas/tweecanos for a night of rebeldia

It's perfect. Not sure if @xicano007 coined it, but who cares? Plus it sounds like a great show.

Multi-American's cultural mashup dictionary kicked off this spring. It's a collection of occasional entries, bits and pieces of the evolving lexicon of words, terms and phrases coined as immigrants and their descendants influence the English language, and it influences them.

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The cultural mashup dictionary: Twittear and Feisbuk

Photo by TexasT/Flickr (Creative Commons)


A recent post on the neologism Googlear has inspired two related entries to Multi-American's evolving cultural mashup dictionary: The social media mashup terms Twittear and Feisbuk.

First, the Wiktionary definition of twittear:

Etymology

From the online microblogging website, Twitter.

Verb

twittear (first-person singular present twitteo, first-person singular preterite twitteé, past participle twitteado)

1. (Internet) to tweet


I've used and heard "twittear" among Spanish-English bilinguals for quite a while, but there's also this adaptation below, as posted in the comments under the "googlear" post by ar2ro:
more than likely i see "el twitter" being used more in time than "twittear."

ex: ya mandaste el tweet? (did you send the tweet?)
mire tu mesaje en el twitter. (i saw you message on twitter)
me gusta el twitter (i like twitter)

twittear somehow does not sound right. even googlear sounds a bit funky, but does roll off the tongue in spanish rather well.

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