How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

Timeline lists several attacks against Sikhs since 9/11

Wisconsin Community Reels After Gunman Kills Six At Sikh Temple

Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images

Mourners at the scene of Sunday's mass shooting at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, August, 6, 2012

In response to the tragic mass shooting yesterday at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin by a man believed to be a white supremacist, BuzzFeed has compiled a timeline of anti-Sikh violence in the United States since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Sikhs, members of a religion rooted in India who are neither Hindu nor Muslim, became targets of hate crimes almost immediately after 9/11, along with Muslims. The turbans worn by Sikh men make them stand out and, for those not familiar with the difference, have led anti-Muslim attackers to target them by mistake.

The list is incomplete. It does not, for example, include the fatal shooting of two elderly Sikh men, Gurmej Atwal and Surinder Singh, shot down last year by an unidentified attacker with no other apparent motive as they strolled through a suburban neighborhood of Sacramento. Still, the timeline is a sad memento to all of those who have been killed or harmed.

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Remembering those who put food our our tables, and those who can't afford it for their own

Photo by Donna Sutton/Flickr (Creative Commons)

Agricultural workers in a field near the California coast, August 2007

A couple of reports released in the past week are good food for thought as many of us head home early tonight to start Thanksgiving preparations.

One gives us a reason to consider ourselves lucky if we're in a position to indulge at the holiday table; the other, a sense of understanding of the difficulties faced by the people who grow and prepare our food, in particular the female workers who make up a large segment of the food industry.

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that around 15% of U.S. households, 17.4 million altogether, didn't have enough money for food at some point last year. Of those, 6.8 million households had chronic financial problems that forced them to miss meals on a regular basis. Minorities, along with single parents, were among those who had it worst. From the report:

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