How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

Tweet of the moment: The irony of the hero intern

Jan Brewer now honoring Daniel Hernandez as hero, which he is.

- @Karoli

What if Daniel Hernandez were a DREAM Act candidate? would she honor him then?

- @Karoli


Of course, it's not the only tweet of the moment concerning Daniel Hernandez, the 20-year-old, openly gay Latino intern who is credited with saving the life of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, his boss, on Saturday in the Tucson shooting rampage that left six dead and many others injured.

Perhaps the most popular tweet of many tonight, when Hernandez appeared on MSNBC's Rachel Maddow Show, came from the certified account of filmmaker-activist Michael Moore, @MMFlint: "20yr old Daniel Hernandez credited w/ saving Rep. Giffords life. "Hernandez?" Is that legal? Arizona, have u checked his papers?"

But then Moore already gets plenty of attention. The tweet above came from a lesser-known but avid Twitter user and blogger named Karoli who, like others captured by the story, saw irony in it. Hernandez, who is dark-skinned, was honored today in Arizona by Brewer, the governor who signed SB 1070, the anti-immigration law whose critics have warned could lead to racial profiling.

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Why Arizona intern Daniel Hernandez's heroism is about much more than that

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1_8ASswyZ0

Much has been made by now of the story of Daniel Hernandez, the 20-year-old intern credited with likely saving the life of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords after Saturday's assassination attempt and shooting rampage in Tucson. The University of Arizona student ran toward the victims after hearing shots fired, checking the pulses of those on the ground and holding Giffords upright as he applied constant pressure to the wound on her forehead. Even after help arrived, he didn't leave her side. He had been on the job with Giffords' office for five days.

At first, it was simply news that he was heroic. It then became news that he was heroic while also being Latino and gay.

In another place at another time, only the heroism would have mattered. But because this occurred in 2011 in Arizona, where it's no secret that Latinos and gays have felt slighted by some of their political leaders, Hernandez's act of bravery has become as much symbolic as heroic.

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After the Tucson shooting, conversation about 'rhetoric' remains tied to immigration

Photo by Tom Peck/Flickr (Creative Commons)

Border fence in Cochise County, AZ

It's a given that the suspected gunman in the fatal shooting that left six dead and critically wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords this weekend in Tucson wasn't acting purely on the political rhetoric coming out of the Grand Canyon State, nor on Sarah Palin's map of congressional districts with crosshairs over them. As with most things, it's much more complicated than that.

But Saturday's tragedy, regardless of the shooter's motive, has opened up a discussion that is still worth having. The incident has led to a national conversation about the political tone that has been coming out of Arizona, and much of that has to do with immigration politics - and, yes, the surrounding rhetoric.

The state is embroiled in controversy over its SB 1070 illegal immigration law, another new law that has essentially banned a Mexican American studies program, and the championing by some conservative political leaders of a national movement to deny U.S. citizenship to the children of undocumented immigrants.

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In the news this morning: The Arizona shooting, ethnic studies, birthright citizenship and more

Arizona shooting: Arizona's us-versus-them brand of politics - Los Angeles Times From the story: "Condemnation of the state's tough law on illegal immigration — including boycotts that cost the state millions of dollars — has furthered an us-versus-them attitude among some Arizonans."


Intern's actions may have saved Rep. Gabrielle Gifford's life - USA Today How 20-year-old intern Daniel Hernandez came to Giffords' rescue after the shooting, trying to stop the bleeding from her wound.


Illegal immigration: Can states win fight against 'birthright citizenship'? - CSMonitor Some experts suggest that birthright citizenship could be a difficult target, in part because the 14th Amendment is among the "clearest passages of the Constitution."


Rights groups seeks to block more of Arizona immigration law - Reuters The American Civil Liberties Union and six civil and Hispanic rights' groups seek a preliminary injunction to block two sections of the law targeting day laborers and those who hire them.

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Immigration, hate, and the Arizona shooting

Photo by Patrick Dockens/Flickr (Creative Commons)

How much of a role did the immigration debate and racial-ethnic hatred play in yesterday's devastating shooting in Tucson that killed six and injured 13, among them U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords? The motive of suspected shooter Jared Lee Loughner, described as mentally unstable, is still unclear and may always be. But there are connections to both that continue to develop.

A Department of Homeland Security memo leaked to Fox News pointed to a possible link between Loughner and the radical group American Renaissance, which advocates white supremacy. From the memo published by Fox:

...strong suspicion is being directed at AmRen / American Renaissance. Suspect is possibly linked to this group. (through videos posted on his myspace and YouTube account.). The group’s ideology is anti government, anti immigration, anti ZOG (Zionist Occupational Government), anti Semitic.

Gabrielle Gifford is the first Jewish female elected to such a high position in the US government. She was also opposite this group’s ideology when it came to immigration debate.

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