Without A Net

Pop culture from Southern California and beyond.

'Tower Records Project' wants your rock and roll memories, and money to catalog them

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40427 full

Be on the lookout, rockers. Tower Records founder Russ Solomon has issued a call to arms (and/or sleeves), to all former employees and customers of the famous chain. 

The historic record store honcho is building a sky-high pile of archival material, and is hoping you have money and memories to contribute.

In collaboration with the Center for Sacramento History, Solomon is launching The Tower Records Project, a fundraising campaign on a mission to preserve, and publicly display, the legacy of the bankruptcy-busted, Sacramento-based chain.

The effort to maintain the chain's history actually began a few years ago, notes the project website.

In 2009, founder Russ Solomon donated over 200 boxes of Tower-related history—artwork, photographs, memorabilia, awards, business records and correspondence, office furnishings and even the neon signs from the first stand-alone store—to the Center for Sacramento History. 

Looking ahead, Solomon says he wants employee stories, photos, and any other relevant mementos, "Whether you worked or shopped there, we want to hear from you. Your invaluable contributions will help paint a complete picture of Tower as it was: a cultural epicenter, an extended family, a way of life and a scene unto itself."

The official kickoff announcement for the project will be Thursday in Sacramento, providing an excellent excuse for SoCal memorabilia hoarders in need of a road trip.

Solomon and the Center have set a goal to begin cataloging in fall 2012, and project a 2015 debut in Sacramento. A traveling exhibit would follow with stops in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., New York and other cities.

In the meantime, here are a few songs about records. If we could embed vinyl, we certainly would. 


 

Lisa Brenner can be reached via Twitter @lisa_brenner

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