Pop culture from Southern California and beyond.

TV show 'Smallville' continues in comic book form

DC Comics

Superman in Smalville: Season 11 #1

"Smallville" managed to be the longest running sci-fi/fantasy series on network television, running 10 seasons before going off the air last spring. Well, it's back for more, except in comic book form.

Smallville: Season 11 #1 just launched today, and in an interesting approach, it's going to be a weekly digital comic available for about a dollar a week. I downloaded and read the first issue, and it reads like... well, like an issue of "Superman." The way the characters are drawn are in line with what they look like on the TV show, but other than a little more Green Arrow (who isn't regularly part of standard Superman comics) and Chloe Sullivan (who isn't a regular character in other Superman comics), it's a pretty standard introductory story.

In this first story, the world seems to be adjusting to having a superhero in their lives. Superman is initially spoken of by all the characters before he's actually seen, ultimately saving a Russian space satellite.

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'Heroes + Villains' gallery show combines superheroes and gay culture

Philip Bonneau

"The Golden Age Flash"

Philip Bonneau

Homeless Superman

Philip Bonneau

"Batman and Robin"

Philip Bonneau

"The Boy Wonder"

Philip Bonneau

"The Green Lantern"

Philip Bonneau

"Captain Cold"

Philip Bonneau

"Superman"

Philip Bonneau

"Lex Luthor"

Philip Bonneau

Heroes + Villains #2 poster


Geek art has become increasingly prominent, ranging from the denizens of sites like DeviantArt and Etsy to galleries like Los Angeles's own Gallery 1988. A show in that vein combining superheroes with gay culture is opening in Atlanta next week.

The show is called "Heroes + Villains #2," following a similar exhibit last year. The previous version focused on Marvel Comics, but this time photographer Philip Bonneau is going DC. He covers characters from the mainstream icons of Superman and Batman to lesser known characters like Flash villain Captain Cold. One of those pieces looks at Wonder Woman in a different light:

"Not every boy wants to be Batman or Superman; some boys want to be Wonder Woman," Bonneau told the GA Voice.

Bonneau himself is gay, and he brings that to his work with the way he depicts many of the characters, though he also does shots of these heroes in more traditional costume. Bonneau says that superheroes enjoy popularity in the gay community.

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Something else being pirated: Comic books

Terry Chay/Flickr (Creative Commons-licensed)

Canon 9950F scanner

Showing that, if there's a thing that it's possible to pirate, people will do so, a piracy community has even sprung up around pirating comic books. Every Wednesday, when new comics are released, pirates will hurriedly scan all the new books and put them out on the Internet.

It's an interesting group as comic companies begin putting out their comic books for sale online officially; DC Comics made news recently by going "day-and-date digital" for the first time in September, releasing all their new comic for sale online the same day they're available in stores. They're still charging the same price as those paper copies, so there are still going to be plenty who refuse to pay those prices for their comic book fix. (Of course, there are some who, no matter how cheap the official source is, will never pay.)

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San Diego Comic-Con 2011 in photos

I came, I saw, I avoided being conquered. Check out this photo gallery of San Diego Comic-Con 2011 sights from the worlds of comics, film, TV and more.

Looking forward to returning to Nerdy Gras for more next year.

(Photos: Mike Roe/KPCC)

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