Pop culture from Southern California and beyond.

Radio drama lives on through live performance in LA

We talked earlier this week about Marvel Comics putting out an audio version of their comic Daredevil #1, but some groups are putting on far more extensive live audio productions right here in Los Angeles. The most well-known of these groups is probably the Thrilling Adventure Hour, which runs shows at the Largo Theater, but there's more than that around town.

This weekend, the group Captured Aural Phantasy Theater is putting on a show called Comic Book Summer Camp at the NerdMelt stage at Meltdown Comics. The show features live performances of old school comic book stories, live music, comedy, art and more.

This particular show is going to be summer-themed; they say it will include "tales of summer vacation, summer fun and summer love." And Meatballs references. The comic they mention on their site that I'm most excited for: Superboy pulling double duty and dating both Lana Lang and Lois Lane at summer camp. (Superheroes get all the girls.)

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The fashion of Steve Jobs - Not just black turtlenecks

Apple's legendary leader Steve Jobs became known for his trademark black turtleneck and jeans, but that wasn't the only version of Jobs' aesthetic. As Jobs steps down from his iconic run as Apple's CEO, a look back at the looks that defined the man.

In this 1970s photo of a young Steve Jobs with Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak, Jobs has a beatnik meets hippie look going on, but you can already see that turtleneck collar he would later make his calling card.


Apple, via AP

Jobs has tried on a variety of facial hair, but while displaying the Apple II in 1977, he goes with a pretty standard business look with a shirt and tie.


Apple Computers Inc./AP

The height of 1980s business fashion sense, Jobs goes clean cut with a suit and a bow tie, showing off an early Macintosh in 1984. It was still black and white, and the early Macintoshes didn't even have internal hard drives the way we've come to know them, relying on diskettes.

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Sunset Junction canceled - No Hanson for you

With the latest Los Angeles Board of Public Works decision to deny Silver Lake's Sunset Junction a permit for this weekend, it looks unlikely that the festival is going to go on. What will hipsters do without L.A.'s mini-Coachella?

Personally, I love festival shows. (Well, except for that one I got appendicitis during, but most concert festivals.) I had yet to make it out to Sunset Junction since I moved to L.A., but had a conversation last weekend with a friend about a band I inexplicably love - Hanson.

Amidst all the indie darlings playing Sunset Junction, one of Sunday's headliners was scheduled to be... Hanson. While most likely remember them as a one-hit wonder for "MMMBop," they had a number of other singles that charted, with particularly strong performances in Australia and the United Kingdom (the home of pop music love).

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Daredevil #1 released in blind-friendly audio version

 

Marvel Comics is reaching out to an unusual demographic for a visual medium: The blind.

They're using the world's most famous blind superhero to do it, Daredevil. Marvel's released an audio edition of Daredevil #1 for free on their website.

The audio edition features writer Mark Waid reading his script, including full comic panel descriptions. Marvel editors play the various characters. It's a great place to start, given the blind character; it's also a comic that's received high marks from both critics and fans. (I'll add my personal endorsement; as a comic book fan, it's one of my favorite comics of the year.)

According to Marvel.com, Senior Editor Steve Wacker came up with the idea. It also plays even for those with sight, providing an audio play version of the new comic.

It's being termed an experiment, but it'll be interesting to see if more major comic books get the audio treatment in the future, both as a service to the blind and another medium to present their superheroes in. It's also an interesting insight into Waid's writing, as you get a chance to hear what he includes in the scripts he provides to artists to finish creating comics he works on.

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Does anyone care about comedy clubs anymore?

Alf LaMont, director of marketing and development at Los Angeles comedy club the Comedy Store, wrote an editorial that ran this morning on comedy site Laughspin looking at how the influence of L.A. comedy clubs has changed. He charts their rise thanks to Johnny Carson and "The Tonight Show" to the decline in an era of Internet democratization.

When was the last time you went to a traditional comedy club? From anecdotal evidence, they seem to not have the same influence they once did. Rather than the Comedy Store being the place everyone talks about, it's more likely to be somewhere like the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater or other smaller venues. As LaMont puts it, "To the casual observer, the difference between the clubs is minimal, while the stellar casts of shows produced at Largo and UCB are cutting-edge and thrilling."

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