Southern California breaking news and trends

New study predicts LA's future climate down to the neighborhood level

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Photo by Matt Niemi via Flickr Creative Commons

And now, with a look at the extended forecast for 2041 to 2060, is UCLA with a report that may have some Southland residents sweating... 

UCLA's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability released a study Thursday that takes a look at Southern California climate trends, and sees a mid-century future that could tap the thermometer up 4 to 5 degrees across the region.

The study, "Mid-Century Warming in the Los Angeles Region," shows impact on the Southland's varied landscapes with predictions down to the neighborhood level. In downtown L.A., where a record high was set in 2010 at 113 degrees, the number days to top 95 degrees could triple, for example.

 

 

Researchers say the study's unique regional modeling is significantly more precise than previous climate models. Paul Bunje, the executive director of UCLA's IoES Center for Climate Change Solutions, called the study "the best, most sophisticated climate science ever done for a city," in the release.

The report, produced with funding and support from the city of Los Angeles in partnership with the Los Angeles Regional Collaborative for Climate Action and Sustainability (LARC), is being called "the most sophisticated regional climate study ever developed," by UCLA


"The changes our region will face are significant, and we will have to adapt," said [Alex] Hall, an associate professor in UCLA's Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences who is also a lead author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports, which, among other things, assess global climate-change simulations for the United Nations.

 



"Every season of the year in every part of the county will be warmer," Hall said. "This study lays a foundation for the region to confront climate change. Now that we have real numbers, we can talk about adaptation."

The full report is available online at c-change.la.

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