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LA County Sheriff's jailer arrested for allegedly assaulting inmates, falsifying reports

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Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca speaks during a news conference at Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters Oct. 6, 2010 in Washington, D.C.

Los Angeles County sheriff’s jailer Jermaine Jackson was arrested Thursday afternoon for allegedly assaulting inmates and falsifying the subsequent police reports, authorities said.

One of the inmates who was allegedly assaulted by Jackson was Cesar Campana at the Compton courthouse lockup in December 2009, with Derek Griscavage allegedly assaulted on Christmas Day 2010 at the Twin Towers Correctional Facility in downtown Los Angeles.

Jackson faces six charges, including four felonies: two assault charges and two assault with a deadly weapon charges. That deadly weapon? His feet. “He kicked inmates,” said Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Steve Whitmore. The other two charges are for falsifying police reports. Three charges apply to each incident.

There is video of the incident, but it won’t be released due to the investigation being ongoing, Whitmore said.

“Information came to us by way of the inmates, and others, and we began the investigation,” Whitmore said. “It was several months. It took a long time to put the pieces together.”

Jackson, 35, is a five-year veteran of the force. He spent his entire career as a custody deputy in the Twin Towers Correctional Facility, Whitmore said.

“The important thing to remember is that it was our investigation. Nobody else did this. Feds didn’t do it, nobody else did it. We did it,” Whitmore. “We found out about it, we pursued it, and we arrested him today, and we’re going to cooperate to the fullest extent of the law, and we are confident of a full and complete prosecution.”

Jackson is scheduled to be arraigned, and if the district attorney chooses to move forward, the DA’s justice integrity division will handle the case.

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