The Latest | Southern California breaking news and trends
Health

LA Fit Expo shows off latest products in health, nutrition



Richard Beber creates high-priced weighted vests that are better suited to the shape of a woman.
Richard Beber creates high-priced weighted vests that are better suited to the shape of a woman.
Alice Walton/KPCC
Richard Beber creates high-priced weighted vests that are better suited to the shape of a woman.
Roland Kickinger is with Sexy Nutrition. He offers clients an eye scan to determine how well their digestive system and major organs are working.
Alice Walton/KPCC
Richard Beber creates high-priced weighted vests that are better suited to the shape of a woman.
LA Fitness Coffee at the LA Fit Expo. The company claims the coffee's blend of 16 herbs and spices can lead to weight loss.
Alice Walton/KPCC
Richard Beber creates high-priced weighted vests that are better suited to the shape of a woman.
The Squatty Potty is designed to give people better posture on the toilet, supposedly leading to better health.
Alice Walton/KPCC
Richard Beber creates high-priced weighted vests that are better suited to the shape of a woman.
Bill Edwards is the man behind the Squatty Potty. He claims it can heal hemorrhoids, increase bladder function, and maybe lower your risk of colon cancer.
Alice Walton/KPCC


Amid the strongman contests, double-dutch competitions and exercise classes at this weekend's 10th annual LA Fit Expo, the estimated 40,000 attendees could peruse the latest supposed breakthrough health and fitness products.

You name it, they had it: eye scans, "fitness coffee," high-priced workout vests, even the Squatty Potty.

The Studio City-based Sexy Nutrition offers eye scans that can allegedly discover the problems with a person’s digestive system and major organs. 

“It’s an eye scan where we scan your iris and then we will measure internal deviations – strengths and weaknesses. According to this health evaluation, we will then give you specific protocols” for a customized diet, said the company’s Roland Kickinger.

A few booths over, LA Fitness Coffee pitched itself as a weight-loss drink thanks to its blend of 16 herbs and spices, including ginger, licorice, cardamom and tumeric.

“In a clinical study done on 1,200 participants, 83 percent of them lost weight doing nothing to their daily regimen except replacing their morning blend with fitness coffee,” said Fitness Coffee's Matthew Berman.

The company’s website notes that its statements have not been vetted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Vendors also showed off the latest in exercise equipment. Speed Builder is a company that creates form-fitting weighted vests that add resistance to any work out. The company’s Richard Beber suggests people wear about 10 percent of their body weight. The vests, which can retail for as much as $650, are especially designed with women in mind. 

“The impact of that activity when you’re working out can harm a person. Speed Builder has weight packets and the anatomically perfect design for women,” he said.

One of the more unique products on display was the Squatty Potty – a stool that hugs the bottom of a toilet.

“It elevates your feet and gets your knees above your hips when you’re going to eliminate,” said creator Bill Edwards.

Last year, the company sold 50,000 stools, which are available in plastic and bamboo.

“Our mission is to change the way America poops – and we say one stool at a time,” he said.