Southern California breaking news and trends

For sale: Beverly Hills home where Beatles partied

MLS

In 1996 the Beatles rented this 4,330 square foot house from Zsa Zsa Gabor during their North American Tour. It is on the market for over $3 million.

Is $3.1 million too steep for a Beatles fanatic to invest in a piece of L.A.'s rock and roll real estate history? A fab, four-bedroom, six-bathroom house, complete with a wine cellar, hardwood floors, five fireplaces, six-car garage, swimming pool and musical mythos, on 2.53 acres of land, is on the market.

Both Beatles guitarists seemed to have dropped LSD at the 2850 Benedict Canyon Drive residence during a stay that George Harrison said was significant to the band. "There was one very important day at that house," Harrison said of the 4,330 square foot, Spanish-style, home they rented from Zsa Zsa Gabor in 1965.

"John and I had decided that Paul and Ringo had to have acid, because we couldn't relate to them any more. Not just on the one level - we couldn't relate to them on any level, because acid had changed us so much. It was such a mammoth experience that it was unexplainable: it was something that had to be experienced, because you could spend the rest of your life trying to explain what it made you feel and think. It was all too important to John and me. So the plan was that when we got to Hollywood, on our day off we were going to get them to take acid. We got some in New York; it was on sugar cubes wrapped in tinfoil and we'd been carrying these around all through the tour until we got to LA."

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Recovery underway for worker buried under dirt in Benedict Canyon

trench rescue recovery benedict canyon beverly hills

Photo via NBC LA

Rescuers attempted to retrieve a worker trapped in an 8-foot-deep trench on North Benedict Canyon Drive.

A rescue effort for a male worker fully buried beneath three or more feet of dirt in an estimated eight-foot-deep trench at 1265 N Benedict Canyon has been reclassified as a recovery operation, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

75 LAFD personnel have been assigned, says department spokesperson Brian Humphrey via Twitter.

Firefighters receive highly specialized training for these types of operations, Humphrey told KPCC. The work of the LAFD's Urban Search and Rescue responders is "among the most physically and emotionally difficult," he said.

In handling the delicate operation, the goal now is to "recover remains with dignity and respect" and determine how the situation occurred, says Humphrey, who noted that CalOSHA had been notified and the "coroner will be notified once remains are recovered."

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