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Bryan Stow beating case: Dorene Sanchez takes the stand to testify about her brother and fiancé

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Bryan Stow, escorted by his neurosurgeon Dr. Gabriel Zada and medical staff, is taken from Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to Bob Hope Airport for a trip to San Francisco General Hospital last year.

A reluctant Dorene Sanchez took the stand this afternoon to testify in the preliminary hearing that will determine whether or not her brother, Louie Sanchez, and her fiancé, Marvin Norwood, will face trial for assault and mayhem in the beating of Bryan Stow.

Dorene Sanchez allegedly drove the “getaway vehicle” for the two men, and was granted “use immunity” for her testimony in the preliminary hearing—which means that if she’s prosecuted for a crime, her testimony here cannot be used as evidence against her, so long as she’s truthful. She told the court she testified because she had been subpoenaed, not because she wanted to.

Sanchez’s testimony started with the beginning of the Opening Day game at Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011, which she said she drove to and attended with the defendants and Louie’s now 11-year-old son, also named Louie (but called “Baby Louie” and “Porky” by his family).

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Bryan Stow case: Witness IDs Sanchez and Norwood from the stand

Photo via NBC LA

Louie Sanchez and Marvin Norwood are the primary suspects in the March 31, 2011 beating of Bryan Stow in the Dodger Stadium parking lot.

This morning, the court heard testimony from Mary Dolores Donley, who said she was parked near the spot where Bryan Stow fell to the ground after being struck in the head after Opening Day at Dodger Stadium in March 2011.

Donley testified that she was waiting for her cousins outside her parked car that day, when she heard a man yell something like, “[expletive] you, mother-[expletive].” Donley said she and her husband then ran toward the “scuffle," where she saw a man kick Stow, who she said was visibly unconscious, in the head.  Donley said her husband and cousin tried to intervene, keeping the man away from Stow. Donley said her daughter was the one who placed the 911-call heard Wednesday in court.

Donley also identified the defendants from the witness box. Asked whether she could pick out the men she described as the attacker and his companion in court, Donley pointed first to Louie Sanchez as the man who allegedly kicked Stow in the head and then to Marvin Norwood as the man who she said accompanied Sanchez. Donley did not apparently witness the punch that other witnesses said knocked Stow unconscious. Donley did say she heard his head hit the ground, a “terrible sound” that she’d “never heard before,” and described the sound as “cracking.”

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Friend describes Bryan Stow getting blindsided with hay-maker punch before hitting the ground, unconscious

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Bryan Stow, escorted by his neurosurgeon Dr. Gabriel Zada and medical staff, is taken from Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to Bob Hope Airport for a trip to San Francisco General Hospital last year.

Corey Maciel paused to collect himself while testifying in the preliminary hearing that will determine whether there’s enough evidence to send Louie Sanchez and Marvin Norwood to trial for beating Bryan Stow outside Dodger stadium March 31, 2011. Maciel, a San Francisco Giants' fan, attended the game with Stow and two other friends. What allegedly happened afterward in the parking lot left Stow with brain trauma. 

Maciel said his friend and coworker’s head was the first thing to hit the ground after a man in a white Dodgers jersey and blue Dodgers hat ran up beside him and delivered a “tight, hay-maker punch” to Stow’s head. (“Hay-maker” is a boxing term, used to describe a hit that uses a boxer’s whole body behind it to add force.) Maciel said the assailant kicked Stow three times in the head after he fell. Prosecutors have accused Louie Sanchez of being that man. His co-defendant, Marvin Norwood, is also accused of participating in the beating.

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